Immigrants May Not Cost Much Now, but They Will Later

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 4, 1996 | Go to article overview

Immigrants May Not Cost Much Now, but They Will Later


I have for years admired Professor Julian Simon's sometimes seemingly single-handed struggle against the ecological doomsayers and his willingness to lay money on the line in support of his position predicting that their scenarios of dire shortage and disaster are false. Especially noteworthy is his support for the valid concept that a larger population can be better for an advanced economy than a shrinking one.

Therefore, I was dismayed to see the major fallacy in his statistical comparison of public funds provided immigrants, especially recent ones vs. natives - that is, long-term residents. This statistic is repeated in his recent letter, with his citation of $3,800 in public funds received by natives vs. $2,200 to $2,600 received by immigrants (see his March 21 letter, "Check the data, and you'll find natives get more benefits than immigrants," and his March 11 Commentary article, "Immigration exploitation myths . . . or reality?").

From the bar graph accompanying his article as well as the text, it is obvious that the cause of this conclusion is his calculation of transfer payments on a current-year basis, in which the massive difference in Social Security and old-age medical payments favoring long-term residents outweighs the difference in favor of immigration in all other categories. But the two types of payments (Social Security and Medicare vs. all others) are structurally different and funded differently. Of course, most recent immigrants are now paying into Social Security, whereas natives are receiving more payments per capita out of Social Security. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Immigrants May Not Cost Much Now, but They Will Later
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.