Warner Will Tread Softly at Party's Convention

By Cain, Andrew | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 24, 1996 | Go to article overview

Warner Will Tread Softly at Party's Convention


Cain, Andrew, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Carl Sandburg, the poet who called Chicago the "city of the big shoulders," also wrote that fog slips into a city on "little cat feet."

U.S. Senate hopeful Mark R. Warner might want to slip in and out of next week's Democratic National Convention in the same stealthy manner.

Mr. Warner is trying to unseat Sen. John W. Warner, Virginia Republican, in a traditionally conservative state that has voted Republican in 11 of the last 12 presidential elections. The Democratic challenger and the Republican incumbent are not related.

Mark Warner is not a formal member of the Virginia delegation in Chicago. But the former chairman of the state Democratic Party is a familiar face to most of Virginia's 97 delegates and 13 alternates.

In Chicago, he hopes to mingle with potential donors and co-host a breakfast for the Virginia delegation with Sen. Charles S. Robb without giving his opponent fodder for the fall campaign.

"I support the president. I'm going to vote for the president. But there are some issues I agree with him about and some issues we disagree about," Mark Warner said from Charlottesville in a telephone interview.

In the latest example, yesterday President Clinton signed off on new regulations allowing the Food and Drug Administration to institute new controls on tobacco and crack down on teen-age smoking.

But Mark Warner, who is running for the Senate in a state in which tobacco is the leading cash crop, will not step on the dangerous "third rail" of statewide Virginia politics.

"I disagree with [Mr. Clinton] on tobacco," Mark Warner said. "I don't think we need the FDA to regulate tobacco."

Lt. Gov. Donald S. Beyer Jr., the top elected Democrat in Virginia state government, had planned to spend four days at the national convention, primarily to mingle with Democratic governors such as Howard Dean of Vermont, Evan Bayh of Indiana, Parris Glendening of Maryland and Gaston Caperton of West Virginia.

But Mr. Beyer will skip the convention to deal with a family crisis. Authorities say Donald Sternoff Beyer III, 20, the lieutenant governor's son, jumped from a Maryland bridge into the Potomac River Sunday and was rescued by boaters.

The lieutenant governor "feels his place is with his family at this time, and he hopes the folks in the delegation understand and respect that," said his spokeswoman, Page Boinest. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Warner Will Tread Softly at Party's Convention
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.