Bandison Not Sorry for Trying to Make a Play on Crucial Down

By Elfin, David | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 17, 1996 | Go to article overview

Bandison Not Sorry for Trying to Make a Play on Crucial Down


Elfin, David, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Washington defensive tackle Romeo Bandison didn't make any apologies for committing the costly facemask penalty on what coach Norv Turner called the crucial play of Sunday's 27-26 loss to Arizona, which knocked the Redskins from playoff contention.

"If I was in the same situation again, I would do the same thing," said the little-used Bandison, who gave the Cardinals 15 yards and a first down at their 49 after hauling down quarterback Kent Graham by the facemask on third-and-16 during the game-winning drive. "I didn't know if I would have had a sack, but I was trying. I couldn't wrap him up, but I had a free hand so I was trying to grab the inside of his shoulder pads. When I realized it was the facemask, I let go, but it was too late. It's always a bad feeling when you hurt your team."

Said Turner: "Romeo's trying to make a play. Do you reach up and grab the facemask? No. Was he trying to grab the facemask? I don't think so. It was bad timing more than anything."

Along the same lines, veteran tight end James Jenkins was the Redskin who failed to block Tommy Bennett when the Cardinals' rookie broke through and forced punter Matt Turk to fumble, setting up Arizona's go-ahead touchdown in the fourth quarter.

LOOKING AHEAD

If the Redskins beat the Cowboys or if the Cardinals lose at Philadelphia, Washington will finish third in the NFC East.

In addition to its normal home-and-home series with NFC East rivals Arizona, Dallas, the New York Giants and Philadelphia, finishing third would mean Washington will travel to Pittsburgh and Chicago next year with Baltimore and St. Louis coming to Raljon. Pending the final week results, Washington would also visit Carolina and Cincinnati and play host to Jacksonville and Tampa Bay. If the Redskins fall to fourth by losing to the Cowboys while the Cardinals upset the Eagles, Washington would visit Baltimore, New Orleans, Detroit and Jacksonville. …

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