India's Decision to Halt Missile Production Was Economic, Not Ideological

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 10, 1996 | Go to article overview

India's Decision to Halt Missile Production Was Economic, Not Ideological


Like all peace-loving people, Khalistani Americans are pleased that India has decided to suspend production of the intermediate-range Agni ballistic missile ("India bows to U.S., shelves intermediate-range ballistic missile," Dec. 6). However, the Trishul, Prithvi and Akash missiles remain in India's arsenal. India now boasts that it has an ICBM, the Surya, which has a range of 11,900 miles. According to India's Defense Ministry, it "can hit any place at any time."

According to the British documentary "Nuclear India," India spends 25 percent of its development budget on nuclear development but just 4 percent on health and education combined. It has refused to sign the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), which is a very important control on nuclear development. Clearly, India has not repudiated its ambition of hegemony over South Asia.

The reason for India's decision to halt production of the Agni missile is economic. India currently spends 47 percent of its total revenues just to pay the interest on its debt. The Associated Press reported in July 1994 that several Swiss drug companies had closed operations in India because the market was unstable. The Washington Post reported that it takes the average Indian three days' pay just to buy a box of corn flakes. India cannot afford to develop the Agni any further while its economy is in such shambles. India is on the verge of economic and political collapse.

Despite this instability, the regime's campaign of terror against the Sikhs continues. India's state terrorism was revealed again on Dec. 2 when a train was blown up in Haryana, just five miles from the border of Punjab, Khalistan, killing more than 20 people. …

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