U.S. Math, Science Teaching Called `Flawed'

By Innerst, Carol | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 15, 1996 | Go to article overview

U.S. Math, Science Teaching Called `Flawed'


Innerst, Carol, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Children in other countries beat American students on international science and mathematics tests because the U.S. curriculum is unfocused and demands too little too late, according to the study being released today.

The finding could lead to centralized national standards that could override local control of education.

"The system has a fundamental flaw in it - it's splintered," said William H. Schmidt, a professor of education at Michigan State University and director of the National Research Center for the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).

"The solution is systemic and deeply structural," he said in an interview yesterday. "To solve the problem is not trivial. There are no magic bullets here."

TIMSS involved testing 500,000 students in 30 languages in 45 countries and in five grade levels. For the first time in any international study, researchers looked at textbooks, curriculum guides and teaching practices as well as test results.

Country-by-country rankings of TIMSS, funded by the National Science Foundation, will come out next month. Among the findings of the curriculum component being released today:

* U.S. standards are unfocused and aimed at the lowest common denominator.

* This approach reflects the fragmented nature of the U.S. educational system - authority for education is distributed among federal, state and local governments and a "loose federation of organizations" - and the lack of common standards on what to teach and how to teach it.

* As a result, it is too optimistic to expect our students to do as well in science and, especially, in mathematics as do students in other countries. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Math, Science Teaching Called `Flawed'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.