Executives of D.C.-Based Associations Receive Top Salaries

By Kopecki, Dawn | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 7, 1996 | Go to article overview

Executives of D.C.-Based Associations Receive Top Salaries


Kopecki, Dawn, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Association executives across the country will top this year's pay scales with a 5.3 percent increase over 1995, and experts predict more raises on the way.

The heads of District-based trade or membership organizations will take home $113,000 to $164,000 this year, the highest pay in the country within the industry, according to the 1996-1997 National Compensation Study.

But when compared with the Consumer Price Index, a measure of inflation, the national numbers don't look as rosy, said Jeannine James, president of Great Falls-based American Research Co. Inc., which conducted the study.

The profession as a whole posted a 1.9 percent increase in pay this year after adjusting for inflation.

Female association executives still fall behind men on the pay scale. Women head smaller organizations and bring home 58 cents for every dollar their male counterparts are paid.

But Damon Cordom, president of a District-based human resources consulting firm that publishes a similar biannual study, said good news is on the horizon. Associations have come to his company, Cordom Assoc., in droves the past six months, asking him to review salary schedules.

"The organizations' activities may be picking up . . . and things might be loosening up," Mr. Cordom said. "They've waited long enough, and they can't wait any longer to review their compensation plans."

* * *

Elkridge, Md., businesswoman Jennifer Jordan could double her annual business sales in three days next week.

Miss Jordan's Audio Video Electronic Recordings Associates is the sole audio contractor for this year's conference of the Association of the United States Army. Miss Jordan records and sells audiotapes of the presentations. Like many other area businesses, she depends on the lucrative conference industry for the bulk of her revenues.

Miss Jordan said she set up shop primarily because of the booming local conference market. The AUSA's 25,000-member, three-day meeting is her largest client to date. Without that meeting, Miss Jordan might see 25,000 people a year - all meetings combined. …

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