Army Race Bars Defense Sponsorships

By Nearman, Steve | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 8, 1996 | Go to article overview

Army Race Bars Defense Sponsorships


Nearman, Steve, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Defense contractors no longer will be allowed to finance the Army Ten-Miler, nor will a powerful defense lobbying group be allowed to share in the race's profits, according to sweeping changes in the Army's organization and management of the nation's largest 10-mile road race.

The changes, announced late last week by Secretary of the Army Togo D. West Jr., resulted from an independent panel investigation into the race, which is expecting a record 9,000 entrants Sunday. The panel was established after The Washington Times reported in April that the race violated Army and Department of Defense policies and also risked losing its USA Track & Field sanction and insurance because of safety concerns on the course.

The panel was made up of representatives of the U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center, the Army Audit Agency, the Army Inspector General, and the Army General Counsel.

The course, which begins at the Pentagon, has been modified at the start and finish, and it has received its USATF sanction. Race officials also are adding fencing to help guide runners, improving communication on the course, and trucking in water for runners so they won't have to rely on the city's much scrutinized and often questioned water supply.

The Army decided to eliminate its practice of soliciting commercial sponsorship money from defense contractors such as Raytheon, Boeing Sikorsky and Bell Helicopter Textron in return for advertising space on the race's T-shirts, applications, bib numbers and start/finish banners.

Race officials had known since a 1993 Army Auditor General audit of the 1992 race that such defense contractors were not permitted to sponsor a Morale, Welfare and Recreation event, which the Army considers the Army Ten-Miler. Defense contractors paid their sponsorship fees to their lobbying arm, the Association of the United States Army (AUSA), which in return wrote a check to the Army for the race. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Army Race Bars Defense Sponsorships
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.