Soothing Tones Music Therapy May Help Ease Anxiety of Mothers-to-Be Tones: Music Therapy Helps Ease Anxiety

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 21, 2019 | Go to article overview

Soothing Tones Music Therapy May Help Ease Anxiety of Mothers-to-Be Tones: Music Therapy Helps Ease Anxiety


Byline: Juli Fraga Special To The Washington Post

Before she became a mother, Elizabeth Larsen, 42, of Huntley, Illinois, endured four miscarriages. The losses were devastating, and complicated her feelings about her future pregnancies.

"I was always worried, waiting for the other shoe to drop. I felt broken and depressed," Larsen says.

Looking for ways to soothe her anxiety, her yoga teacher recommended music therapy. Larsen tried it and loved it.

"I wanted to find wellness tools to ensure that my baby and I would have a safe and wonderful birth. Music therapy opened up my bodily senses and helped me to relax," Larsen says.

It might sound unconventional, but recent research suggests that music therapy may lessen symptoms of prenatal anxiety for some women, which, in turn, may benefit the health of her child.

Unlike traditional psychotherapy, where people talk about their problems, music and other expressive arts therapies seem to help people dealing with mental health issues, including depression, eating disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder, several studies suggest.

Music's role in healing has been promoted for quite some time. In 1948, a study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association recommended that physicians incorporate music therapy as a part of routine patient care. By the 1950s, music was being used as a complementary therapy to treat mental-health concerns.

More recently, music therapy has been used to help veterans recover from PTSD. New studies suggest that singing and listening to music triggers the brain to release oxytocin and dopamine, neurotransmitters and hormones tied to such emotions as joy and love.

A recent study looked specifically at music and mental health concerns during pregnancy, focusing on 409 pregnant women in the third trimester of their pregnancy. None of the women had a history of anxiety. Half of the women received music therapy, which meant listening to a CD of relaxing, instrumental, melodic music three times a week; the other half did not. After completing therapy, the women who participated in music therapy reported being less anxious than those who did not receive the intervention.

"During pregnancy, fears and anxieties about the health of the baby are very common. Many of the women in our study were anxious about the stress test, an ultrasound that examines the health of the baby," said Jessica Garcia-Gonzalez, the study's lead researcher. The study suggests that "anxiety during pregnancy can increase a woman's risk of postnatal anxiety and depression, but music therapy can help reduce stress."

While women know pregnancy can bring physical discomfort such as fatigue, swollen ankles and sleep concerns, many aren't aware that maternal mental health concerns such as depression and anxiety are also common complications of pregnancy.

Postpartum Support International, a nonprofit group focused on raising awareness about prenatal and postpartum mood concerns, says that 6 percent of pregnant women and 10 percent of new mothers suffer from anxiety right after birth, while 15 percent of women struggle with more significant depression after childbirth. …

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