Call for Manuscripts for the February 2001 Focus Issue: Mathematics and Culture

Teaching Children Mathematics, October 1999 | Go to article overview

Call for Manuscripts for the February 2001 Focus Issue: Mathematics and Culture


The February 2001 issue of Teaching Children Mathematics will focus on the role of culture in describing, learning, teaching, and assessing mathematics. Mathematics is a vital aspect of culture. It reflects and is simultaneously created with aspects of the cultures of all its users. Teachers can help students gain a deeper understanding of how mathematics has evolved and continues to evolve and of the students' role in this evolution as they connect mathematics and culture in the classroom. As teachers guide, facilitate, and extend students' investigations and experiences, multiple concepts are simultaneously explored. When students realize that they possess an innate ability to think and to become creatively involved in the study of mathematics, they learn that it is everywhere and part of everything in which they participate.

The Editorial Panel wishes to illustrate the importance of connecting students' mathematics study and culture by using examples of mathematical contributions from around the world, culturally based mathematics in both Western and non-Western settings, informal or out-of-school mathematical situations, social connections and implications, and assessment of diverse learners. Manuscripts that include photographs and examples illustrating cultural diversity are especially encouraged.

The list of topics and related questions are intended to guide authors in addressing one or more aspects of mathematics and culture. Articles that discuss the diverse cultural needs and unique experiences of students as related to race, ethnicity, gender, social class, and ability or disability are particularly welcome.

Mathematics of People throughout the World: Ethnomathematics in the Classroom

* What are examples of culturally influenced mathematics used by people throughout the world?

* What are some examples of the cultural contributions made by famous mathematicians from around the world? …

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Call for Manuscripts for the February 2001 Focus Issue: Mathematics and Culture
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