The Bard and the Boogie

By Drake, David | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), November 9, 1999 | Go to article overview

The Bard and the Boogie


Drake, David, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


Shakespeare meets disco as a New York City theater troupe turns A Midsummer Night's Dream into a nightly party called The Donkey Show

With a new Donna Summer CD on the charts, That '70s Show picking up an Emmy, and Saturday Night Fever landing its multimillion-dollar platform shoes on Broadway in September, the endless disco revival is clearly stayin' alive. Indeed, to relive the heyday of Studio 54, one need only step into the glitter-ball confines of New York City's Club El Flamingo, where a lively new theatrical experience called The Donkey Show has set the tres gay Chelsea neighborhood a-boogying back in time.

"There's something about this music that inspires joy and memories," says the show's 23-year-old producer, Jordan Roth, who wasn't yet born when "Ring My Bell" and "You Sexy Thing" were putting the bump into the world's hustle. However, he says, "I think from my generation there's this fascination with disco and with that era. We sort of missed something."

The brainchild of codirectors Diane Paulus and Randy Weiner, The Donkey Show takes the story line of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream out of the Athenian forest and into a '70s nightclub. In place of the Bard's text, the lovers now lip-synch their journeys to a seamless collage of disco hits--from "Car Wash" to "Don't Leave Me This Way"--while audience members intermingle with the production's 12 cast members on the dance floor. Climaxing with the titular bacchanal, in which two Brooklynite "Vinnies" are transformed into a donkey, complete with gender-bending drag kings, a tutu-twirling Rollerina, and a peacock-feathered Tytania catapulted onto the shoulders of four buffed Speedo-clad "fairies," the presentation is an intoxicating mix of classical forms and modern imaginations.

"I knew something was really happening here," Roth recalls of his discovery of The Donkey Show last year in a wee Lower East Side performance space. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Bard and the Boogie
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.