'History Speaks' Explores How Nations Atone for Historic Crimes -BYLN- Submitted by Naper Settlement

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 31, 2019 | Go to article overview

'History Speaks' Explores How Nations Atone for Historic Crimes -BYLN- Submitted by Naper Settlement


The Naper Settlements next "History Speaks" program will be "Stumbling on History: How Nations Atone for Past Wrongs" from 4 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, in Century Memorial Chapel, 523 S. Webster St. in Naperville.

In the presentation by Fern Schumer Chapman, she will discuss how countries recognize, accept responsibility, and atone for historical crimes.

From Australia to the United States, nations have wrestled with this ethical dilemma. Interestingly, Germany provides leadership through a public arts project. It is detailed in Chapmans 2016 book, "Stumbling On History: An Art Project Compels a Small German Town to Face Its Past."

Chapmans mother, Edith Westerfeld Schumer, is a Holocaust refugee who has lived in Chicago since arriving in the U.S. in 1938. She has wondered if the memory of the Nazis murdering her parents, along with other victims, will outlive the survivors.

Seventy-six years after Ediths parents saved their daughters life by sending her, alone and terrified, to America, she returned to the German town where her family had lived for years.

Invited to witness the installation of an artistic memorial to her family titled Stolpersteine ("Stumbling Stones") part of an effort throughout Europe to confront the genocide of World War II she experienced how art is helping todays generation face and atone for crimes of the past.

Cost is $10, $9 for youth ages 4-12 and students; the fee for members is $8, $7.

Reservations are recommended, but not required, by calling (630) 420-6010 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays. Visit www.napersettlement.org/historyspeaks

The "History Speaks" program explores prominent historic figures and topics.

On March 10, the program will be "The Womens Suffrage Movement and the Good Roads Movement in Illinois." Is it a coincidence that the freedom to travel offered by the automobile expanded during the time when the Womens Suffrage movement finally became more successful? The automobile freed women from the constraints of train timetables and the physical labor involved in hitching up a team of horses. …

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