Students with Learning Disabilities Transitioning from College: A One-Year Study

By Hadley, Wanda | College Student Journal, Winter 2018 | Go to article overview

Students with Learning Disabilities Transitioning from College: A One-Year Study


Hadley, Wanda, College Student Journal


Increasing numbers of students with learning disabilities are enrolled in colleges and universities each academic year. According to the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) (2012), a large percentage of the students that enter higher education institutions identified as having specific learning disabilities such as dyslexia. Learning disabilities are a comprehensive term used to refer to learning disorders that cause difficulties in auditory, visual and/or spatial perceptions. Legislative mandates that protect students with learning disabilities are different in the college setting than in secondary education and, therefore, require different behavior for students with learning disabilities. While in the secondary school system, students with learning disabilities are provided services based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement (IDEIA) Act of2004 which requires secondary schools to provide wide-ranging accommodations. But when students transition to higher education their services are directed by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. These laws require that students with learning disabilities self-advocate for accommodations and practice more independent behavior in the college setting. The purpose of this study is to examine how a group of 10 junior and senior students with learning disabilities are preparing for their transition from college to graduate school and/or employment.

Review of the Literature

AHEAD (2012) states that learning disabilities are evaluated by psychologists and other professionals using a variety of standardized tests/psychoeducational assessments that measure ability, achievement and processing of facts. The testing identifies and corroborates the nature of the student's learning disability. The psychologist develops a learning profile which identifies the student's strengths and weaknesses and the impact the disability has on the student's ability to learn and perform in an academic setting. Once it is clear what the learning disability is, it can be determined what accommodations may be necessary for the student to be successful in their classes. A learning disability is not visible and does not go away once the student graduates and goes off to college (Hadley, 2009). Hadley further notes that through compensatory counseling techniques students are taught to understand their disability beyond a superficial level and seek accommodations that minimize the limitations the learning disability may cause in their courses. Students should be encouraged to use all the recommended supports available in starting their college courses. In transitioning to college, students with learning disabilities are expected to become their own advocates. Through transitioning planning for college, students with learning disabilities need to be taught explicitly what it means to be on their own, make decisions, and organize themselves. For students with learning disabilities, self-understanding is the key to self-advocacy in college (Madaus, Zhao, & Ruban, 2008).

Theoretical Framework

Riesen, Morgan, Schultz, and Kupferman (2014) found it concerning the degree to which students with learning disabilities participate in significant career awareness and career development activities. In addition, Bellman, Burgstahler, and Ladner (2014) noted that students with learning disabilities are less successful than their peers without learning disabilities in obtaining post-school employment. Hitchings et al. (2001) noted that relatively little is known about the career decision making process of students with learning disabilities. Further, Hitchings et al. found that many students with learning disabilities lack an awareness of career choices, have very little knowledge of career decision-making processes and lack sufficient skills for entering the work force. Therefore, the ongoing impact for many individuals with disabilities is underemployment or unemployment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Students with Learning Disabilities Transitioning from College: A One-Year Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.