Can Trump Use 'Emergency Powers' to Build Border Wall?

Manila Bulletin, February 5, 2019 | Go to article overview

Can Trump Use 'Emergency Powers' to Build Border Wall?


By Agence France-Presse

President Donald Trump has indicated he could declare a national emergency in order to force the construction of hundreds of miles of border wall to prevent migrants from crossing into the United States illegally from Mexico.

Trump is frustrated by the continuing high level of migrants, mostly from Central America, crossing the border and seeking asylum, with more than 50,000 a month detained during the final three months of 2018.

Congress has refused to allocate the $5.7 billion he wants for the wall, but there remain deep questions over whether he has the prerogatives to take the "emergency" route.

- Trump does have emergency powers -

The National Emergencies Act allows the president to declare a national emergency, providing a specific reason for it.

That then allows the mobilization of hundreds of dormant emergency powers under other laws.

Those can permit the White House to declare martial law, suspend civil liberties, expand the military, seize property and restrict trade, communications, and financial transactions.

Every recent president has used the NEA, and more than two dozen states of emergency are currently active, renewed annually.

President George W. Bush invoked it after the September 11, 2001, Al-Qaeda attacks to expand the military beyond what was budgeted and to undertake secret surveillance and employ interrogation methods on detainees widely denounced as torture.

President Barack Obama declared an emergency in 2009 over the swine flu threat, giving authorities and hospitals extra powers to act quickly against the outbreak.

An NEA emergency in place since 1979 has restricted trade with Iran. Another, dating to 2006, blocks property of people who were deemed to be undermining democracy in Belarus.

Powers, funds limited

But the powers are not unlimited and can be blocked by Congress and the courts. During the Korean War in 1952, President Harry Truman sought to take over US steel factories when industry workers planned a strike.

The steel companies sued and the Supreme Court ruled in their favor, saying emergency powers did not allow the president to seize privately-owned plants to avert a strike. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Can Trump Use 'Emergency Powers' to Build Border Wall?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.