Personal Web Sites Becoming New Tool

By Carr, M. Anthony | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 5, 1999 | Go to article overview

Personal Web Sites Becoming New Tool


Carr, M. Anthony, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


More than 500 Realtors from Northern Virginia just wrapped up their annual convention in Tysons Corner. If they follow just a little bit of advice from the keynote speakers, you are going to see even more Web sites across the great electronic expanses of cyberspace.

This time, though, the next surge of Web sites are going to get personal. You'll still see Web sites with snazzy names like Realtor.com and Homefinder.com and Homebuilder.com and Remodel.com in full force. The quiet revolution, however, is going to take place on the local level.

Like politics, real estate is local. You can't package a plot of land and ship it across the state. (Well, you can, but then it's not a plot of land, it's a plop of land.) So, as much as all the large Web sites want you to believe its part of the cyberworld is the only place to find real estate in your neighborhood, the folks who really know where the latest hot listing is located will now be after your mouse click. Terri Murphy, www.terrimurphy.com, is the latest cyber-evangelist of electronic personal marketing. "Your name is the cornerstone of your business identity," she preaches to thousands of real estate professionals across the nation.

This practice of using your personal name as your domain name is nothing new, it's just now coming of age. One Realtor in our area who has done this for a while is Lilian Jorgenson with Long & Foster Real Estate. She understood years ago the power of her name. It's a simple domain - www.lilian.com.

I don't know Ms. Jorgenson personally, so she's not paying me to tell you about her Web site. It's just a darn good site. It's graphically pleasing, gives the consumer what he or she wants and has a variety of properties from $199,900 to $1.3 million. Right now her site is almost one of a kind in the Washington, D. …

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