1998 EVE Awards Finalists: And Then There Were Twelve

By Wells, Judy | The Florida Times Union, May 31, 1998 | Go to article overview

1998 EVE Awards Finalists: And Then There Were Twelve


Wells, Judy, The Florida Times Union


The first stage of suspense is over. A panel of community

judges has selected 12 finalists, four in each of three

categories -- Employment, Volunteer Service and Education -- for

the Times-Union's 1998 EVE Awards.

The award winners will be announced at a luncheon June 16 at

the Prime Osborn Convention Center. Elizabeth "Beth" Ayers

McCague, the first woman to be chair, CEO and president of First

Union Bank of Tennessee, will be the keynote speaker.

Selected as finalists for their achievements in the area of

education are Sheila H. Brady, director of continuing education

at Jacksonville University; Cheryl Fountain, associate provost

of the University of North Florida; Marcelle C. Lovett, dean of

continuing education and extension at the University of North

Florida; and Cheryl A. Schmidt, professor on the engineering

technology faculty of Florida Community College at Jacksonville.

Standouts for their volunteer services are Ann S. Kopelousos,

Karen McCarthy, Mike McDowell and Mary Ellen Smith.

Topping the nominations in the employment category are Stuart

B. Evans, president of the Cultural Council of Greater

Jacksonville; Lee Lomax, group manager and senior vice

president, business services, Merrill Lynch Credit Corp.; Shahla

Masood, professor and associate chair and assistant dean for

research at the University of Florida's University Medical

Center urban campus; and Davalu Parrish, executive director of

The Bridge of Northeast Florida.

Based on reports from those who nominated the women, here are

some of their achievements:

Education

Expanded programs developed and implemented by Sheila Brady

during the past year helped boost enrollment in Jacksonville

University's Continuing Education Department by 40 percent and

improve educational and vocational opportunities for First Coast

residents.

Brady created a daylong conference on Alzheimer's disease for

500 health care professionals, administered the Dolphin Fine

Arts Camp that introduced 480 youngsters to the arts last

summer, expanded the Jacksonville University Children's Chorus

-- which performed at New York's Carnegie Hall -- to 75 and

partnered with Green Thumb to provide home health care training

to seniors, 95 percent of whom found jobs as a result.

In addition to her volunteer work at JU, Brady is vice

president of special programs for the Executive Board of the

Jacksonville Symphony, was president and chair of Goodwill

Industries of Northeast Florida for more than three years and is

a member of Leadership Jacksonville, Leadership Florida, the

Jacksonville Women's Network and the Youth Crisis Center Board.

Cheryl Fountain led two major projects during 1997, including

the last year of the Jacksonville Urban Educational Partnership,

a three-year collaboration with Duval County Public Schools,

Duval Teachers United and Florida Community College at

Jacksonville to improve schooling in urban classrooms. She

designed that project and served as its director, involving 11

school sites in Duval County, as well as several university and

community college faculty members and administrators and

hundreds of elementary and secondary teachers, teaching interns

and university education majors.

For the New Century Commission on Education, Fountain served as

a member of the staff, designed the implementation model,

orchestrated public input at hearings and the Education Summit

and drafted much of the final 155 recommendations to the Duval

County School Board. …

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