Jacksonville Symphony Names Boston Pops Vet

By Phelps, Bob | The Florida Times Union, April 24, 1998 | Go to article overview

Jacksonville Symphony Names Boston Pops Vet


Phelps, Bob, The Florida Times Union


Gary L. Good, who produced the Boston Pops and Symphony

orchestras' national television shows, was named president of

the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra yesterday, culminating a

seven-month national search.

The orchestra announced that Good, 51, now president of the

Omaha Symphony Orchestra, will take control of symphony

operations July 1. He replaces interim executive director Linda

Gillis, who replaced Nan Harman, the symphony president, in

September.

Good arrives at a time of crucial changes in the symphony,

with the orchestra in the midst of contract negotiations with

its union musicians and with Music Director Roger Nierenberg

about to step down after 14 years. Mary Ellen Smith, symphony

board chairwoman, said Good will have a role in selecting

Nierenberg's replacement.

Good's salary in his new post is confidential, said Travis

Storey, who was the Jacksonville Symphony board's chairman of

the search committee. The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra paid Good

$142,820 per year when he was executive director in 1991 and

1992, according to news reports.

Storey said Good was not an applicant for the job but was

sought out by a national search firm. "He has a tremendous

amount of industry experience in areas that we have not explored

in the past," Storey said.

As production manager of the Boston Pops and Boston Symphony

orchestras, he produced the orchestras' public television series

Evening at the Pops and Evening at the Symphony in 1978 and

1979. …

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