I-95 Rapes Links Sought Agencies Checking Old Cases

By Jackson, Gordon | The Florida Times Union, September 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

I-95 Rapes Links Sought Agencies Checking Old Cases


Jackson, Gordon, The Florida Times Union


WOODBINE -- A composite sketch led to the arrest of a Brunswick

man who was charged Friday night with raping two women traveling

on Interstate 95 in Camden County, authorities said yesterday.

A Glynn County police officer stopped a pickup truck driven by

Matthew Loran Cercy, 23, about two weeks ago because the man

resembled a police artist's sketch drawn from the victims'

descriptions of their attacker, authorities said.

Officer Kevin Wilborn also was suspicious because the truck

driven by Cercy, a red Nissan, matched the victims' description

of their attacker's car, said Glynn County Police Chief Carl

Alexander during yesterday's news conference in Woodbine.

After the stop, Wilborn asked Cercy to talk to investigators,

and he agreed, Alexander said.

"When he [Wilborn] made the traffic stop, a lot of things

seemed to fit," Alexander said. "He notified our detectives;

they came out and started interviewing this person."

That investigation brought police to Cercy's home in the 400

block of Buckingham Place in Brunswick Friday night with an

arrest warrant, Alexander said. Police said Cercy is a

self-employed contractor. Neighbors said he and his wife have

one small child.

On Friday, the Camden County Sheriff's Office charged Cercy

with 17 counts relating to three attacks since March, including

two counts of rape, two counts of aggravated sodomy and two

counts of kidnapping with bodily injury, police said.

Other charges include seven counts of aggravated assault, three

counts of possession of a firearm during the commission of a

crime and one count of kidnapping, police said.

"I think it's a significant arrest," Alexander said. "There

have been several incidences that this person is going to be

tied to."

The three attacks for which Cercy has been charged are:

The March 19 rape of a woman whose car was stopped on the

shoulder of the Exit 1 ramp of Interstate 95.

A May 11 incident in which the tires were shot out on a

family's vehicle as they drove though Camden County on I-95. A

man approached the vehicle and left when he realized there were

two children and an adult male accompanying the female driver.

A May 31 rape of a Virginia woman at gunpoint after someone

shot out the tire of the Jeep she was riding on I-95 in northern

Camden County. The woman and her boyfriend were traveling home

from Key West, Fla. When they pulled over, another motorist

stopped behind their vehicle. The driver forced the couple into

woods next to the highway and raped the woman while her

boyfriend was forced to watch.

The highly publicized May 31 incident garnered many tips to

local authorities, police said.

Although a Camden sheriff's office artist drew a sketch from

the couple's description of the attacker, it was the Glynn

County police sketch that Wilborn recalled.

"We do appreciate the media coverage in this case because the

media picking up the information and putting it out generated a

lot of calls for us," said Guy Ellis, an investigator with the

Georgia Bureau of Investigation office in Kingsland. …

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