Training Technique Crime Scene Scenario Site of Police Seminar

By Dickson, Terry | The Florida Times Union, September 24, 1997 | Go to article overview

Training Technique Crime Scene Scenario Site of Police Seminar


Dickson, Terry, The Florida Times Union


JEKYLL ISLAND -- Police officers worked in the woods

yesterday gathering artificial evidence at a fake crime scene.

First, they found evidence scattered in and around a plastic

skeleton lying in the leaves and then crossed a trail to

excavate another that was buried earlier.

The officers are on Jekyll Island this week for the 27th

annual educational seminar of the Georgia State Division of the

International Association for Identification. The association's

members are detectives, crime scene technicians and laboratory

specialists who gather and test evidence used in solving crimes

and criminal convictions.

Although the training scenarios are simulated events, some

parts -- such as the dirt, steamy heat and swarming mosquitoes

-- are too real.

"You can't beat the old-fashioned way," said Lowell McNeal,

the Gainesville, Ga., police detective who is president of the

organization. "Patience, lifting prints, getting on your hands

and knees. It takes getting your nose to the ground."

There was plenty of opportunity for that at the two

make-believe crime scenes set up by Karen Cooper, a crime lab

analyst supervisor with the Florida Department of Law

Enforcement's Fort Myers office.

Along with the plastic skeletons, Cooper had placed a

handgun, a spent shell casing, a slug, some identification and

other evidence among the leaves that had accumulated over

several years. A group of seven officers marked off an area,

removed debris, sifted it all through screens, took

measurements, made photographs and notes and treated it like a

real crime scene.

"You've got to do this to get into court with it," McNeal

said after the officers, who included detectives and crime scene

and lab technicians, found the evidence Cooper had concealed.

It also is important to gather anything from the body that

would help identify the victim, Cooper said.

"A lot of times in these cases, we don't know the victim,"

she said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Training Technique Crime Scene Scenario Site of Police Seminar
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.