'Do the Right Thing as You Comb through Stylish New Trends in Hair, Consider Soft, Simple, Short, and Even Shaved; but More Importantly, Make Sure It's Suited to You

By Macdonald, Dan | The Florida Times Union, January 16, 1997 | Go to article overview

'Do the Right Thing as You Comb through Stylish New Trends in Hair, Consider Soft, Simple, Short, and Even Shaved; but More Importantly, Make Sure It's Suited to You


Macdonald, Dan, The Florida Times Union


With a new year upon us, there's no better time than now to

part with the old hair style.

While last year will be remembered as the year of the Rachel

cut, made popular by Friends star Jennifer Aniston, there's no

celebrity sporting the main mane for this season.

That's good news for common folk. Hair styles that work on some

are disastrous for others. Face shape, complexion and lifestyle

are the primary considerations when choosing a haircut -- not

Nielsen ratings.

Local hair professionals, as well as those in New York City,

had slightly different conceptions of this year's can-do do's,

but they all agreed on one thing -- the Rachel cut is as old as

the Rachel/Ross plot line. If you've aped that look, you're in

drastic need of a new style.

TREAD SOFTLY

They also agreed that soft is the byword for 1997. Popular hair

styles for women will be shoulder-length or a tad shorter, with

ends cut at an angle so they flip up. Those opting for

permanents will look for waves rather than tight curls.

Variations of the pixie cut, like the one worn by Josie Bissett

of Melrose Place, will also turn heads. Already some stars like

Kim Basinger, Ashley Judd, Geena Davis and Teri Hatcher have

gone short.

"The idea is to get away from lacquered looks, hair that is

stiff. I've never liked hair spray on women," said Steve Gold,

New York City-based fashion commentator seen on Inside Edition

and American Journal.

A hair style shouldn't betray the amount of time the person

spends getting ready each morning. Low maintenance can be

attractive. But it still has to be neat.

That's why Madonna probably won't be a hair trendsetter with

her Evita hair style. While the 1940s-era look is glamourous,

it's too much work. However, women opting to have longer hair

will be pulling it up in less-structured hair styles for a

less-formal look.

"A lot of stylists are predicting that the Evita look will be

really hot, but I find that hard to believe," said Mary

Greenburg, editor of Celebrity Hair-styles magazine. "I have a

feeling that not a lot of women around America are going to run

to the salon to have that kind of thing done. It's a lot of

work. It's very stiff. Maybe for going out at night."

Soft is also the word for African-American women. Big,

sculptured hair with beads and other ornaments, while not out,

won't be as popular as it once was.

"Most ethnic people like to wear their hair up and short," said

Jacksonville stylist Shelia Thomas. "Wear your hair up if you

don't want to cut it. But the trendy look is short and sassy

with low maintenance."

Oprah Winfrey's latest cut, as well as Halle Berry's bob, are

two examples of styles expected to be popular.

BOTTLE BROWNS

Colors will lean toward browns and reds. Blond bows to brunette

with stars like Tori Spelling, Drew Barrymore and Courtney Love

putting away the bleach bottle. Similar shades should be

incorporated as highlights to give a natural look.

Large "skunk stripes" made an appearance last year, but now

leave experts with a turned-up nose. Subtle, gentle highlight

streaks, like those worn by Teri Hatcher or Courteney Cox, are

in.

Professionals say coloring hair at home can be risky business.

Natural hair color has a lot to do with how a dye will look; it

may or may not wind up the same color shown on the package.

"I strongly advise that you see a hair colorist. …

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