Crispy Baked Chicken Is Something to Crow About

By Kelley, Ann J. | The Florida Times Union, October 31, 1996 | Go to article overview

Crispy Baked Chicken Is Something to Crow About


Kelley, Ann J., The Florida Times Union


The next time you're shopping for a quick and convenient meat

to have in your freezer you might try Butterball Chicken

Requests Crispy Baked Breasts, members of the Times-Union

Consumer Panel recommend.

These pieces of breast with rib meat are lightly breaded and

baked, not fried. The chicken is available in several flavors

and cooks in about 20 minutes in the oven. Panelists tried the

Original flavor.

One breast contains 170 calories, 5 g. fat, 570 mg. sodium, no

sugar and 45 mg. cholesterol.

Revlon molder, Gloria McKever likes the Butterball Chicken

Requests Crispy Baked Breast and described them as "moist and

tender with a good flavor."

McKever said the breasts, which baked in the amount of time

called for on the box, had a crisp coating. "I shared them with

my Dad and he said they were cooked just right."

What does she think of the price of $1 a breast? "It's not too

bad," she said, "because chicken breast is high anyway."

McKever says "with or without a coupon" she wants to try

Italian Herb and some of the other butterball flavors, however,

she had a hard time finding a store that carried them.

Chef Danny Griffin cooked the breasts in the time called for on

the box and then put them back for eight more minutes. "I wanted

the chicken really crispy."

"My daughter likes them," Griffin said. "It's a convenience

product for a quick meal. It saves cleaning and is a lot easier

than breading and frying chicken myself."

Although attorney Jeanne Miller said the chicken breasts "could

have been a little more tender" she thought they were "pretty

good."

"There is a nice balance between the flavor of the breading and

the chicken," she said. "It accents the chicken well. The

breasts are a little high in calories, but fairly low in fat. …

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