Incidents Make Roster Look like Aftermath of Hurricanes

By Morgan, Marlon W. | The Florida Times Union, August 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

Incidents Make Roster Look like Aftermath of Hurricanes


Morgan, Marlon W., The Florida Times Union


It wouldn't be the University of Miami if controversy didn't

surround its football team. The two almost have become synonymous.

Last season, the first for coach Butch Davis at Miami, the

school had an NCAA investigation hanging over its head. A 1-3

start didn't help, but Davis was able to rally the troops in

time to win the final seven games and earn a tie for the Big

East championship with Virginia Tech.

A quick decision from the NCAA resulted in a ban from the

postseason last year and reduced Miami's scholarships from 85 to

80. According to Davis, the NCAA's prompt decision was a blessing.

"Probably the most important thing had to do with recruiting,"

Davis said. "The ability to go into the homes and tell

[recruits] that it was over, there was not going to be clouds of

the investigation hanging over everyone's head. Every kid would

be able to come to school knowing they would be able to play for

a conference and national championship."

This year is no different. During the off-season, linebacker

Marlin Barnes was murdered. Defensive end Derrick Ham was

suspended indefinitely after police said he beat his girlfriend.

Three other players -- receiver Jammi German and linebackers

James Burgess and Jeffrey Taylor -- were suspended for beating a

UM hurdler. German is suspended for the season.

"You never like to wake up in the morning and read the newspaper

or get some phone call that says so-andso has been suspended,"

Davis said.

"But it's part of the job. …

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