They're Still Chasing FSU

By Thomas, Bob | The Florida Times Union, August 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

They're Still Chasing FSU


Thomas, Bob, The Florida Times Union


TALLAHASSEE -- Rest assured the 44,300 raucous fans on hand at

Virginia's Scott Stadium weren't the only ones exchanging

high-fives when the Cavaliers brought Florida State's 29-game

Atlantic Coast Conference winning streak to a close last November.

Virginia's 33-28 victory, in front an ESPN Thursday night

audience, allowed the league to breathe a sigh of relief. By

proving the Seminoles' mortality, after their 3 1/2-year

unbeaten run, finally there was hope.

Georgia Tech coach George O'Leary, perhaps forgetting about the

advances in technology -- like the fax machine -- fired off a

congratulatory telegram to Virginia coach George Welsh at 7 a.m.

the next day. Similar salutes came from coaches around the ACC,

and the country, throughout the day via telephone.

"Why not?," O'Leary said when asked about the telegram. "I make

no bones about it. I think everybody in this league better be

chasing them [FSU]. You always chase the champs. . . . If not,

you're not going to have any balance in the league."

"Virginia won, and they deserved to win it," Bowden said. "That

helped the conference, but it didn't help our feelings."

The loss has certainly lingered with the Seminoles, adding

credence to their coaches' constant refrain that you must come

to play for 60 minutes, every game.

Linebacker Daryl Bush suggested that the 'Noles may have been

listening too closely to those who said they were invincible as

long as they were playing in the inferior ACC.

"Now you don't have to listen to it because we've lost an ACC

game," Bush said. "That's a reality check."

And the reality of Virginia's victory is that seven other ACC

teams now believe they can follow suit. …

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