Lack of Depth Concerns Donnan Talented Starters Should Help Bulldogs

By Hayes, Matt | The Florida Times Union, August 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

Lack of Depth Concerns Donnan Talented Starters Should Help Bulldogs


Hayes, Matt, The Florida Times Union


You hear it, see it and feel it everywhere around the campus of

the University of Georgia.

Talk of red and black has been buoyed with talk of burnt orange

and blue -- specifically, the Auburn Tigers.

If Terry Bowden can do it, well, so can Jim Donnan. Same

circumstances, same motivation.

There's one problem, Donnan quickly points out, that's being

overlooked: talent.

When Bowden took over as coach of probation-saddled Auburn, the

talent level was high.

At Georgia, which is staring at probable NCAA probation sometime

this fall, it's not nearly the same.

"We have some talented starters," said Donnan, the first-year

Georgia coach. "But after that, it's pretty thin. We can't get

into a situation like last year and hope to survive."

Last year, for most associated with the program, was about as

tough as it gets. The Bulldogs began the season with high hopes

and coach Ray Goff's job on the line.

The season included two injured quarterbacks, six injured

running backs, key mistakes in big games and another

disappointing finish. And Donnan, who built a Division I-AA

power at Marshall the previous six seasons, has to pick up the

pieces.

He'll build around a solid group of starters that includes

quarterback Mike Bobo and tailback Robert Edwards -- both of

whom missed the majority of last season with injuries.

The No. 1 priority, Donnan says, is being competitive -- and

beginning to beat the big three: Florida, Auburn and Tennessee.

In seven years under Goff, Georgia had a 3-15-1 record against

the big three, its once proud program slipping into mediocrity

with each season. …

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