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The Review of Contemporary Fiction, Summer 1998 | Go to article overview

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Ieva S. Celle is a Ph.D. candidiate in the Department of Slavic Languages at Brown University. She has translated Edvins Liepins's novel Riga and the Automobile and stories by Vizma Belsevica, Alberts Bels, and Imants Ziedonis.

Franceska Kirke was born in Riga, Latvia, in 1953. In 1972 she attended Janis Rozentals School of Art in Riga and in 1978 the Latvian Academy of Arts. Her paintings have been exhibited across Europe and America.

Rita Laima Krievipa (nee Rumpeters, 1960) spent the first twenty-two years of her life in the suburbs of New Jersey and New York City. In 1982 Krievipa moved to Latvia, at that time a Soviet Socialist Republic, and has lived there since. Krievina has had three children's books published in Latvia: her translation of and illustrations for Jaime de Angulo's Indianu teikas (Indian Tales, 1991) and illustrations for Jaan Kaplinski's Kas ko ed (Who Eats What, 1993) and for Kakis leca smede (The Cat Jumped in the Smithy, 1994), a collection of Latvian children's counting rhymes. Krievipa's illustrations for her ABC book won the VAGA publishing house's Green Tail Award in 1995. Krievina has worked for the Baltic Observer and the Baltic Times as culture editor, writing about life and people in post-Soviet Latvia. She presently works for the Delegation of the European Commission in Latvia, where she is keeping track of Latvia's EU preaccessions progress.

Iven Lesinska was born in Riga and studied at the University of Latvia, Ohio State University, the University of Colorado, and the University of Stockholm. She has translated a number of contemporary Latvian poets into English and the poetry of T. S. Eliot, Allen Ginsberg, Ezra Pound, and Seamus Heaney, among others, into Latvian. She is currently the editor of the magazine Rigas Laiks.

Sarma Muiznieks Liepins was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1960. Izgerbies, her first collection of poetry, was published in 1980. Subsequently her poems and essays have been published in periodicals in the US, Canada, Australia, Germany, Slovakia, and Latvia. Currently, Liepins works at the Harvard University Widener Library in the Baltic collection and as a professional artist. She lives in Boxford, Massachusetts, with her husband and two sons.

Born in Cesis, Latvia, Ilze Klavipa, Mueller lived in Germany and Australia before moving to the United States, where she makes her permanent home. …

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