Telematics, Narrative and Poetry: The Parole in Jeans Project

By Trentin, Guglielmo | International Journal of Instructional Media, Fall 1999 | Go to article overview

Telematics, Narrative and Poetry: The Parole in Jeans Project


Trentin, Guglielmo, International Journal of Instructional Media


INTRODUCTION

Network communication is primarily based on the written word. Conducting interpersonal exchange in this manner opens up a range of possibilities, offering direct educational benefits through interaction and debate. It also presents a number of indirect advantages.

One such regards the ability to use the written word and the motivation for doing so (Roberts, Blakeslee, Brown and Lenk, 1990). While writing in school traditionally involves producing essays to be marked by the teacher, with computer-based interpersonal exchange it becomes a means of communication, of sharing ideas and experiences, and, in the final analysis, a social tool (Mason, 1993). In this way telematics can change attitudes towards writing and, in all likelihood, help to improve writing skills.

Drawing on these aspects, learning paths centered on text-based communication may be devised that use technology in a creative manner, offering students the chance to become poets and storywriters.

This was the idea behind "Parole in Jeans", a two-year project run jointly by Institute for Educational Technology (ITD) of the Italian National Research Council (CNR) and the Schools and Educational Services Department of the Genoa City Council. This pilot project aimed to promote literature and foster collaborative poetry and story writing in lower-secondary schools.

The classes involved in the project produced simple hypertexts of two types: poetry-based in the case of Parole in Jeans - Poetry and Telematics (1996/97), and narrative-based in the case of Parole in Jeans - Narrative and Telematics (1997/98). In both cases the objective went beyond linguistic-literature aspects, seeking to emphasize the importance of the students' physical and cultural environment.

GENERAL PROJECT STRUCTURE

Conducted over a two-year period, the project comprised similar paths both for poetry and for narrative. These were based on two principle activities:

* approach to the literature genre;

* network-based creative writing.

Phase one (approach to the literature genre) is clearly of an introductory nature, preparing the way for phase two. The classes are organized into learning groups and explore the topic separately through study, lessons and by drawing on resources available locally (writers, documentary sources, etc).

There is a degree of flexibility in this stage, in the sense that one school (the so-called "flag-bearer") follows the suggested path by drawing on a range of local resources and acting as a kind of model. The other schools also focus on literary writing but do not necessarily draw on the same set of resources. This concept is represented in figure 1 (Phase 1) by the arrows of varying length, symbolizing paths that are more or less the same as the one followed by the flag-bearer.

[Figure 1 ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

By contrast, in Phase Two (network-based creative writing) there is considerable interaction between the various classes. The goal is to work together to create pieces of text that follow the dictates of the genre being studied. Far less flexibility is possible here, as the collaborative, network-based activities call for carefully timetabling and coordination to ensure that the classroom activities are carded out in parallel. This aspect is represented in figure 1 (phase 2) by the parallel arrows occasionally in line.

Now let's see how this framework was used over the two years of the project.

PAROLE IN JEANS YEAR 1: TELEMATICS AND POETRY

The Languages Division of Genoa City Council's Schools and Educational Services Department presented the first year of the project in the following manner (Barisione and Scarrone, 1998):

      Cohen notes that poetic language represents the systematic violation of
   the rules of normal language and that "remnants" (at various levels of
   meaning) constitute metaphor and originality in poetic communication. … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Telematics, Narrative and Poetry: The Parole in Jeans Project
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.