Mothers-to-Be Who Smoke Risk Fertility of Their Daughters; Scientists Discover 'Far-Reaching Damage'

Daily Mail (London), March 29, 2019 | Go to article overview

Mothers-to-Be Who Smoke Risk Fertility of Their Daughters; Scientists Discover 'Far-Reaching Damage'


Byline: Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent

MOTHERS who smoke during pregnancy could be harming their daughters' fertility in years to come, research suggests.

Women have been warned about the risks of smoking while pregnant for years, with their offspring at risk of heart defects and other health problems.

But more than one in ten women - 65,000 every year - still smoke all the way through pregnancy.

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have now discovered that the damage is even more far-reaching than thought - and could even put a woman's chance of having grandchildren at risk.

Their findings, published last night in the FASEB science journal, are the first to suggest that girls born to women who smoked during their pregnancy could struggle to have children of their own.

Experiments on rats during pregnancy found that oxygen deprivation - also known as hypoxia - effectively recreating what smokers do to their lungs, resulted in female rat pups born with fewer ovarian follicles.

The researchers say that rats are a useful model for studying human pregnancy because their reproductive biology shares many of the same features.

They believe girls born to women who smoked during pregnancy will see a similar reduction in ovarian function, which they say could result in the loss of fertility and an earlier menopause.

Scientists placed pregnant female rats in reduced levels of oxygen, 13 per cent compared to the standard 21 per cent found in the air, from day six to day 20 of their pregnancy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mothers-to-Be Who Smoke Risk Fertility of Their Daughters; Scientists Discover 'Far-Reaching Damage'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.