Casino Colony Looks Up to China

By Kurlantzick, Joshua | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 19, 1999 | Go to article overview

Casino Colony Looks Up to China


Kurlantzick, Joshua, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


****MACAO, TIRED OF GAMBLING AND CRIME, COMES UNDER BEIJING'S CONTROL TOMORROW.****

MACAO - On any given day, the crowded hydrofoil ferry releases its cargo of raucous, jabbering Hong Kong gamblers at the pier of this tiny Portuguese colony off the coast of southern China.

With money belts open, the tsunami of casino-bound day-trippers sweeps past, leaving behind a few residents of Macao to contemplate life under Chinese rule.

"This is a unique place with the most incredible history in Asia, but it is deteriorating," said Jorge, a man of Portuguese-Chinese ancestors.

"The economy is bad. We are too dependent on gambling to make money. The streets aren't safe. I hope that China can clean the place up without destroying it."

Tomorrow, China gains control of Macao more than four centuries after it was first settled by Portuguese traders.

Unlike nearby Hong Kong, which reverted to Chinese rule in 1997, recent negotiations over the return of Macao essentially have been free of controversy.

In the waning years of Portuguese rule, many residents - weary of the colony's dependence on gambling for a living and machine guns to settle disputes - began looking to Beijing for a fresh start.

"Portugal cannot help us any longer," said Woik Leih, a shopkeeper. "They cannot stop the triads [Chinese crime gangs] or do anything about the economy. Only China can change things."

Macao has been in an economic decline since the late 19th century, when Hong Kong captured its position as a commercial center. More than a century ago, the enclave legalized gambling. Every day, thousands of visitors swarm to Macao, the only legal place to gamble in the region.

On an average night at the Lisboa, the ritziest casino in town, bettors wait in long lines for places at pai-gow (an Asian casino game) tables, chat with Russian prostitutes and call Hong Kong to check on the day's horse races.

Tourism and gambling account for 43 percent of the colony's economy. Because Macao's economy is built on betting, an industry that criminal elements can infiltrate easily, many gangs, or triads, have set up operations in the colony. They rob high rollers, provide prostitutes, supply drugs and offer high-interest loans.

In recent years, triads have gunned each other down at an astonishing rate.

There have been 37 gang-related slayings this year in Macao, which has a population of roughly 437,000. Last year, Judicial Police Director Antonio Marques barely escaped death when his dog detected a bomb under his car seconds before it exploded.

Virtually every day, the enclave's tabloids report on the exploits of organized-crime leaders with colorful names like Broken Tooth Wan. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Casino Colony Looks Up to China
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.