Inside the Ring

By Blazar, Ernest | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 8, 1998 | Go to article overview

Inside the Ring


Blazar, Ernest, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


`WORKING' GROUPS

Since the 1991 Persian Gulf war, the Pentagon has been busy. Not with regular wars, but with a flurry of new and different kinds of missions. Inside the five-sided building, these new tasks go by the acronym "MOOTW," which stands for Military Operations Other Than War.

Key examples of MOOTW are the failed 1993 Somalia mission, the 1994 peaceful invasion of Haiti and the Energizer Bunny mission in Bosnia (it keeps on going and going.)

The Pentagon has adjusted to MOOTW in two ways.

First, of course, it had to change the training of soldiers and Marines. Instead of kicking in doors and lobbing grenades, as they would in wartime, infantrymen had to learn the importance of not shooting first. Speed and ferocity gave way to patience and restraint. (The Pentagon believes it can quickly reverse those skills if a real war comes.)

Secondly, the Pentagon learned that it can't go it alone.

For regular wars, all the Pentagon needs is a clear mission, an open wallet and some elbow room, especially from those in Washington. But the MOOTW missions are more tricky.

In places like Somalia, Haiti and Bosnia, there are problems like refugees, broken infrastructure, local militias, border disputes, ethnic rivalries, rampant poverty, disease, political intrigue and shifting alliances. It's a witches' brew that makes the 1991 Persian Gulf war look clear-cut.

To deal with these, the Pentagon needs help. It comes from the State Department, the Agency for International Development, the Justice and Treasury departments, the Central Intelligence Agency, and others.

The Pentagon has had partial success with MOOTW "peace" missions in the last few years.

The success has been in the field, where, by all accounts, soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines have performed well. Back in Washington, within the battlefields called "interagency working groups," the Pentagon says success has been more elusive.

Take one of the Pentagon's top gripes about the 1994 Haiti intervention.

"One of the primary problems with the interagency process is the lack of a designated group director with . . . the authority to hold agencies accountable for those tasks assigned," said the Pentagon's Haiti after-action report.

The military's formula for success is: Make a promise, then follow through. It's part of the "can-do" military culture.

Other agencies displayed more of a "maybe-do" culture. Said the Pentagon, somewhat cattily: "Military planners assumed the civilian agencies would respond with an equal amount of effort."

The Haiti after-action report is titled "Operation Uphold Democracy: U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Inside the Ring
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.