Trade Treaty Denounced

By Woellert, Lorraine | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 13, 1998 | Go to article overview

Trade Treaty Denounced


Woellert, Lorraine, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Some 600 advocacy groups from 67 nations yesterday held worldwide protests against a proposed treaty they fear could create multinational corporate monoliths that would answer only to themselves.

In Washington, about two dozen protesters carrying signs and chanting slogans dumped a box of handcuffs on the steps of the Capitol to protest the treaty.

"It would handcuff Uncle Sam," said Sierra Club President Michael McClosky. "This is the worst of all the bad trade deals."

Opponents from the left and right of the political spectrum are lining up against the treaty, known as the Multilateral Agreement on Investments, which they fear could undermine national sovereignty and give corporate interests precedence over environmental, labor and even constitutional issues.

The demonstrations took place in advance of a meeting set for next week in Paris at which negotiators will decide how to proceed with talks that already have dragged on a year longer than planned.

Demonstrators carried signs that read "MAI - License to Loot" and "MAI = NAFTA on Steroids," referring to a 1994 trade pact between the United States, Mexico and Canada that has been unpopular with labor, environmental and consumer groups.

Rep. Peter A. DeFazio, Oregon Democrat, joined the group, calling the MAI "a stealth attack on a diverse group of things people hold dear."

Top-level U.S. negotiators will travel to Paris this weekend, where they'll meet with other members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a group of wealthy nations. The organization will decide whether it can meet an April deadline for closing talks on the treaty.

"Our thinking in the United States is that, for a number of reasons, it's going to be difficult to do that," said a U.S. official involved in the talks.

The world's richest nations have been negotiating the MAI for about three years. The talks are part of an unprecedented undertaking that seeks to establish a set of international rules governing nearly every kind of business transaction, from buying land to sweeping chimneys.

The MAI, among other things, would require nations to abandon preferences for domestic companies and would set up a panel to rule on complaints by corporations of unfair government treatment.

The pact is of particular interest to American companies, which have about $3 trillion in overseas investments, more than any other country. Foreign governments often make it extremely difficult or impossible for nondomestic companies to do business. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Trade Treaty Denounced
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.