Busytown Adventure Sharpens Basic Skills

By Szadkowski, Joseph | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 31, 1998 | Go to article overview

Busytown Adventure Sharpens Basic Skills


Szadkowski, Joseph, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


In a world of ultraviolent video games, where dexterity of the thumb and index finger is infinitely more important than flexing the cerebellum, there must be a place for children and their parents to interact and actually learn something from that overpriced multimedia computer/gaming system. Take a deep breath and enter the ROMper Room, where learning is a four-letter word - cool.

Students up to the first-grade level can participate in the mathematics journey of Richard Scarry's Busytown Best Math Programs Ever (Simon and Schuster Interactive, $29.95).

This program created by Mr. Scarry, a children's author, combines 15 fun activities that teach a complete set of basic math concepts using curriculum guidelines and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

The games revolve around the story of Busytown's Mr. Fixit, who has asked the familiar Busytown characters of Lowly and Huckle for their help. Players navigate through Busytown while completing a series of math challenges.

For example, at the hardware store children help customers in the garden center find the shortest birdbath, widest flowerpot, thickest chain and longest hoe. As challenges are completed, children are rewarded with one of the missing parts that Mr. Fixit needs to complete his Math Machine. When built, Mr. Fixit's Math Machine counts, divides, weighs and sorts shapes.

Skills learned while playing include counting, adding and subtracting, along with lessons in simple fractions, symmetry, money, time, multiplying and dividing, geometry and measuring. The progress report and parents information features allow for an easy check into the child's progress.

Extended play continues through activity replay and at the tangram drawing board, a place to experiment with shapes and write stories that can be printed out. Richard Scarry's Busytown Best Math Programs Ever is a hybrid CD-ROM and works with Macintosh and PC systems. * * *

What fan of Superman doesn't want to take on Lex Luthor, save Metropolis and return to the Daily Planet to write the front-page scoop next to the mild-mannered Clark Kent?

The Superman Activity Center (Knowledge Adventure, $20) offers children, ages 5 to 10, 13 games, puzzles and activities that will help hone thinking and problem-solving skills.

For example, Brainiac Challenge takes the player to Krypton, Superman's home planet. Players must help Jor-El (Superman's dad) crack a security code by repeating progressively more challenging sequences of musical notes. By completing a logic maze in a creativity center on Krypton, players can build a prototype of the rocket in which Superman first traveled to Earth.

Smallville is not only the rural town where Clark grew up with Ma and Pa Kent, but also a fun search game. In this hometown atmosphere, players will use Clark's X-ray vision to spot common neighborhood hazards such as exposed electrical wires.

In the big city, Metropolis, players can become cub reporters by writing and laying out the daily newspaper, creating color photos in Jimmy Olsen's darkroom and unscrambling word-search puzzles on Lois Lane's computer.

These and other activities are presented within a continuing story line featuring animated narratives. For added replay value, children can also choose to go back to favorite activities in any order and reset each to three levels of difficulty for a new challenge every time. The program is a a hybrid available for Macintosh and PC play.

* * *

Girls ages 8 to 12 learn the tough lessons of adolescent life in Rockett's Tricky Decision (Purple Moon, $29.95). This third part of the friendship adventure series continues the story of eighth-grader Rockett Movado and her friends at Whistling Pines Junior High School.

Just as in the real world, girls will need to help Rockett decide everything from when to be cool to when to stick up for herself. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Busytown Adventure Sharpens Basic Skills
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.