Clintons Use Niche Media for Demographic Groups

By Strobel, Warren P. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 14, 1998 | Go to article overview

Clintons Use Niche Media for Demographic Groups


Strobel, Warren P., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Sam Donaldson scored a 15-minute interview with President Clinton on the last day of his recent Africa trip. That may not be news, but the veteran ABC correspondent had to wait in line behind four black-oriented news organizations who were given coveted time with the president first.

For Americans who wanted news of the historic journey without any journalistic filtering, the White House set up a special Internet site and updated it frequently with photos and official texts.

Web users logged on 250,000 times.

Convinced that Americans increasingly are turning away from the mass media and seeking information from niche outlets that reflect their personal interests, the White House is following suit.

It is accelerating efforts to reach over and around the national press corps and communicate directly with defined demographic groups that may be sympathetic to, or at least especially interested in, a given policy initiative.

Thus, editors of top women's magazines were invited in last month for special presentations at Cabinet agencies and some time with first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton.

The evolving media strategy will be on display tonight, when Mr. Clinton appears on the ESPN cable sports channel for his second roundtable discussion on race.

"This'll be covered in the sports sections [of newspapers] and on ESPN SportsCenter. . . . It is getting a message across other than in the typical news cycle or in the CNN area," said Mike Soltys, ESPN's director of communications.

That is precisely what the White House had in mind when it contacted ESPN a few months ago and offered to make the president available for a forum on race and sports. It will be broadcast live from Houston and "cybercast" on the network's Internet site.

"We were looking at ways to engage larger and larger audiences," said White House communications director Ann Lewis, including people "who might not otherwise be involved in the dialogue."

ESPN's audience is heavily tilted toward men, but Mr. Soltys said the network's rap as "the white male network" is inaccurate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clintons Use Niche Media for Demographic Groups
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.