How the Empire Strikes Back

By Roberts, Paul Craig | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 17, 1998 | Go to article overview

How the Empire Strikes Back


Roberts, Paul Craig, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Are there any government agencies that are not corrupt? Do lawmakers have the ability to tell the difference between good laws and laws that are harmful to the basic institutions of civilized society, such as the family? It is difficult to answer these questions in the affirmative.

No sooner had the Senate Finance Committee finished its hearings on IRS abuses than new ones came to light. Forbes magazine reports that Ruby Coram, 71, received a $2.8 million settlement from her insurance company when the dishonest doings of an agent left her husband without coverage when he went down with his tugboat off the New Jersey coast five years ago.

Her lawyer, working on a 45 percent contingency fee basis plus expenses, got $1.28 million. Mrs. Coram paid the IRS $600,000 on her $1.52 million share, leaving her with $920,000 to take care of herself and her daughters. Now the IRS is demanding another $200,000. The tax-abuse agency is trying to force Mrs. Coram to pay income taxes on the lawyer's share, too, even though he paid the taxes due on his share. Moreover, there is a federal court decision, Cotnam vs. IRS, that ruled that residents of Alabama, Mrs. Coram's state of residence, can exclude their attorneys' contingency fees from taxable income.

The IRS says it doesn't care what the federal court ruled. The tax abusers are sticking Mrs. Coram with the Alternative Minimum Tax, which doesn't allow deductions from income for lawyers' fees.

Hollis Hallford, 74, is another IRS victim. He lives on $680 a month in Social Security, and the IRS wants his home to pay taxes, penalties and interest on a nontaxable 1993 insurance settlement. The IRS claims that the money was for punitive damages, which are taxable. But the insurance company settled without admitting wrongdoing and no punitive damages were awarded. Bullies are bullies, and the tax abusers know that Mr. Hallford spent his money on his deceased wife's medical bills and has none left with which to pay a lawyer to fight the IRS.

It is the same no matter which agency one examines. The Justice Department has turned loose on Medicare providers 375 FBI agents trained to misrepresent as fraud simple mistakes and befuddlement by health-care administrators confronted with 45,000 pages of Medicare-reimbursement regulations.

The purpose is to raise revenues for the government. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How the Empire Strikes Back
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.