U.S. Security in the Money Bag?

By Lambro, Donald | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 21, 1998 | Go to article overview

U.S. Security in the Money Bag?


Lambro, Donald, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The spidery web of moral scandal, campaign corruption and perjury that has hopelessly snared Bill Clinton, his administration and his party grows stickier and more deadly with each passing day.

The more he struggles to break free of the judicial and law enforcement forces encircling him, the more he seems to become trapped in a web of his own making. Special Counsel Ken Starr is getting closer to making his case that the president did not tell the truth when he denied under oath he had a sexual relationship with a 21-year-old White House intern. He is being sued for sexual harassment. His wife Hillary is being probed for her role in the systematic looting of an Arkansas bank that has cost taxpayers $60 million. Nearly half of the president's Cabinet has come under criminal investigation. And his Justice Department is investigating the White House for campaign finance wrongdoing. And that's only half of it.

The latest bombshell to strike his presidency is the stunning disclosure that a communist Chinese government official, who runs a state-owned aerospace firm, gave $300,000 to Clinton crony Johnny Chung who gave the money to the Democrats in the 1996 elections.

The source of the disclosure is Mr. Chung himself, a well-connected, fat cat, Democratic moneyman who visted the White House 49 times between 1994 and 1996 and who gave $366,000 to the Democratic National Committee for Mr. Clinton's re-election. He has admitted he gave illegal contributions to the DNC and is cooperating with Justice Department prosecutors who have since widened their ongoing investigation into the Clinton campaign finance scandal.

Mr. Chung has told them he received large sums of money in 1966 from Liu Chao-Ying who is a top executive for China Aerospace, a rocket manufacturer for China, and an officer in the People's Liberation Army.

The disclosure is a big breakthrough in the 18-month-old investigation, because for the first time someone has shown a paper trail of illegal campaign money from China to the United States that was intended to influence our elections. This was the story that Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward first broke and that Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson dug into before he was forced to end his hearings in December because of a one-year deadline that recalcitrant Democrats had demanded.

Democratic Sen. John Glenn of Ohio, who insisted the White House and his party did nothing wrong, has not had much to say since the Chung story broke. He maintained throughout the hearings that the China connection was largely unproven - despite intelligence materials shared with committee members behind closed doors that showed there was an effort by China to influence our elections by large, well-placed donations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Security in the Money Bag?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.