White House Hits `Knee-Jerk' Critics of China Policy

By Strobel, Warren P. | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 22, 1998 | Go to article overview

White House Hits `Knee-Jerk' Critics of China Policy


Strobel, Warren P., The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


The Clinton administration and congressional Democrats moved on several fronts yesterday to try to contain the damage from allegations of improper technology transfers to China.

In remarks heralding a significantly more aggressive response, President Clinton's spokesman decried bipartisan House votes this week to halt some exports to China as "very shortsighted" and a "knee-jerk reaction to headlines."

House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt - among the Democrats who voted to restrict the president's power to deal with China - urged GOP leaders to "come to their senses" and drop the idea of a select committee to investigate the issue.

Republicans, however, vowed to press ahead with their inquiries.

The administration offensive seemed somewhat belated given the anger level on Capitol Hill. It also reflected rising White House anxiety at what officials see as lawmakers' increasingly invasive meddling in key foreign policy areas.

Perhaps the most familiar - and potent - argument the administration wielded yesterday was that the policy course favored in Congress would damage U.S. competitiveness and ship U.S. jobs overseas.

At the State Department, spokesman James Rubin used the failure this week of the Galaxy 4 communications satellite, which left millions of pager users and some news organizations without vital communications, to try to illustrate why China should be allowed to launch U.S. satellites.

The proposed legislation "will threaten American leadership in the commercial satellite business, and therefore, threaten an area where America has a competitive advantage," Mr. Rubin said.

The House voted 364-54 Wednesday to bar Mr. Clinton from authorizing any more exports. Another amendment to a defense authorization bill, approved 417-4, urged the president not to enter into new missile or technology agreements with China during his trip there next month and declared that his February decision to allow Loral Space & Communications Ltd. to export another satellite was "not in the national interest."

The Justice Department and Congress are investigating whether the president's trade policy toward China was influenced by campaign contributions. Separately, they are trying to determine whether two satellite builders, Loral and Hughes Electronics Corp., improperly helped China's missile program when they aided Beijing in a study of a failed 1996 rocket launch.

White House officials insisted that none of the exports that Mr. Clinton authorized harmed U.S. national security and that proper procedures were followed.

They began a lobbying blitz of lawmakers and reporters to drive home the point that the policy of exporting satellites to China for launch on Beijing's rockets dates back to 1988 and the Reagan administration.

A lengthy fact sheet provided by the White House said the February export waiver for Loral was based on a recommendation from the State Department, concurred with by the Defense Department and the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Because of the Justice Department investigation of Loral's role in China's missile program, "the White House, in this case, took the added precaution of soliciting the views of the Justice Department," the document stated.

Loral's chairman, Bernard Schwartz, was the No. 1 contributor to the Democratic Party during the 1996 election cycle.

The White House today is expected to send documents regarding the 1998 waiver decision to Rep. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

White House Hits `Knee-Jerk' Critics of China Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.