Flotsam Flowing in Dalton's Wake

By Roberts, Paul Craig | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 12, 1998 | Go to article overview

Flotsam Flowing in Dalton's Wake


Roberts, Paul Craig, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Navy Secretary John Dalton's "politically correct" feminist policies have done the Navy more damage than the Japanese inflicted at Pearl Harbor. His announced resignation has brought sighs of relief from congressional critics and the remnants of the Navy's once proud officer class who are seething over his success in terminating male warrior standards as the Navy's norm.

With Mr. Dalton on the way out, there is one to go - Defense Secretary William S. Cohen. A putative Republican, Mr. Cohen has enjoyed the protection of his former colleagues in the Senate, while he continues to push gender integration in military barracks that leads to the sexual activity that feminists then use to destroy male military careers.

If Mr. Cohen were really a Republican, he wouldn't be helping the likes of Bill Clinton strengthen his feminist voting bloc by pushing "politically correct" policies that are destroying the morale and readiness of the military services. This has finally dawned on the clubby and pusillanimous Republicans, and Mr. Cohen now is under fire for two actions that he cannot explain.

Mr. Cohen has rejected the findings of his own hand-picked panel that he commissioned to study the effects of gender integration in basic training and sleeping quarters. The panel, headed by a woman, was expected to silence criticism by endorsing the Clinton administration's feminism of the U.S. military. Instead, the panel concluded that mixed sex basic training has resulted in declining military standards.

With all evidence against him and none for him, Mr. Cohen's rejection of the panel's findings leave him exposed as Hillary's man at the Pentagon. He is now under attack by Republican lawmakers for "abdication to the demands of political correctness."

Mr. Cohen also is in trouble for defending and keeping in office Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs Kenneth Bacon. Mr. Bacon is known to have violated federal privacy laws, Pentagon rules, and the official privacy regulations that his own office is responsible for enforcing. Yet, despite what Pentagon officials describe as "an extraordinary blatant breach of privacy regulations," Mr. Cohen has kept him in office.

The question is why, and the answer is obvious. Mr. Bacon, a Clinton political appointee, leaked information that he thought would be damaging to the credibility of Pentagon employee, Linda Tripp, the principal witness in the Clinton-Lewinsky perjury and obstruction of justice scandal currently under investigation by Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr.

Mr. Bacon also is the Pentagon official who quietly eased Monica Lewinsky out of the Oral Office by giving the inexperienced intern a high-level job as his confidential assistant. …

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