Pursuing the `Psychology of Stalking'

By White, Bobby, II | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 25, 1998 | Go to article overview

Pursuing the `Psychology of Stalking'


White, Bobby, II, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


On the cover of J. Reid Meloy's new book, a pale-faced woman dressed all in black stands before a white picket fence. Behind her, an eerie shadow broods over her shoulder. The illustration, called "Moonlight," depicts the tragic relationship between a woman and her stalker.

"I wanted to learn who they were and why they did what they did," says Mr. Meloy, who edited the book "The Psychology of Stalking: Clinical and Forensic Perspectives."

Mr. Meloy gathered material for the book from research by experts in the field so there would be one comprehensive source of information on stalking. Mr. Meloy, a forensic psychologist and professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of California at San Diego, gave an all-day workshop for the CIA in Washington yesterday.

In "Stalking," his fifth book, Mr. Meloy takes a look at what he calls "extreme romantic pursuit."

He says some people who stalk have "a courtship disorder," in which there is a history of failed relationships and evidence that they are somewhat lonely, while others have a grandiose sense of self.

"Some of these people are pathologically narcissistic and they are deeply moved by rejection. Then they become preoccupied with the other person," Mr. Meloy says.

The stalkers' reactions to their behavior is just as varied. When confronted by authorities, some stalkers indicate that they believe their behavior is not out of the ordinary while others recognize their problem.

"The more typical pattern is to minimize and rationalize the behavior `. . . All I wanted to do was see her. I needed to talk to her,' " Mr. Meloy says.

He became interested in forensic psychology in the late 1970s while completing his doctorate at the United States International University in San Diego. "I was intrigued with the interaction of psychology and criminal law," he says.

He says he decided to pursue a career in forensic psychology after heading a small maximum-security psychiatric treatment unit for mentally ill felons in San Diego.

When most people think of stalkers, Mr. Meloy says, they conjure up such characters as the one Glenn Close played in "Fatal Attraction. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pursuing the `Psychology of Stalking'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.