Inside the Beltway

By McCaslin, John | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 23, 1996 | Go to article overview

Inside the Beltway


McCaslin, John, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


LEAP YEAR

White House guards can't be too vigilant these days, what with all the kooks who have tried to leap, shoot, even fly their way in to see President Clinton.

Or can they?

During Tuesday's downpour, uniformed Secret Service officers literally locked out the director of the Food and Drug Administration, David Kessler, and top officials of the Transportation Department's Federal Railroad Administration, making them stand in the rain while the computer decided if the unrecognized visitors should be allowed access to the Executive Mansion.

CONSERVATIVE BEHAVIOR

The Washington Post has gone and upset Democratic Party leaders in Fairfax County, Fairfax City and Prince William County. In fact, Monday night's meeting of the 11th Congressional District Democratic Committee was devoted to discussing "the policies of The Washington Post."

"At our meeting we discussed the behavior of your newspaper in relation to our congressman, Rep. Thomas Davis," committee Chairman Daniel S. Alcorn wrote to Post ombudsman Geneva Overholser on Tuesday, referring to the popular Virginia Republican. "For the past year we have been sending releases to your paper pointing out the policy positions of Mr. Davis, especially where we think he has gone wrong. Not a single one of our policy papers has been covered in your newspaper."

As a result, Mr. Alcorn writes, "With the approach of the 1996 election, persons who have considered becoming a candidate, including me, have cited as their chief reason not to put their names forward the obvious bias of your newspaper in favor of Davis, and the unwillingness of the Post to cover the point of view of the opposition political party in this district."

IRA, ANYONE?

Here's a scary thought: Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, West Virginia Democrat, when touting a congressional hearing that will be held this morning to examine the nation's retirement system, pointed out that baby boomers are beginning to turn 50 this year.

DRAFT EVADER

We were looking through a Taylor Gifts catalog featuring all sorts of intriguing gadgets, such as baseball-cap racks, miracle mops and invisible breast enhancers.

Our favorite, though, is the "Clinton Draft Evader," a polyester-filled doll whose legs spread far enough apart to block door drafts. …

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