Embassy Row

By Morrsion, James | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Embassy Row


Morrsion, James, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


NOTHING LIKE A DAME Dame Eugenia Charles sat regally in the ballroom of the Washington Club and felt humbled by the praise.

Diplomats and doyens and royalty in exile from three nations came to celebrate the 78th birthday of the woman who appealed for U.S. troops to intervene in Grenada in 1983. D.C. Mayor Marion Barry declared March 13 an annual day in her honor.

Miss Charles, known as the "Iron Lady of the Caribbean" and named a dame commander of Britain by Margaret Thatcher, the original "Iron Lady," was heralded at her birthday party by Jeane Kirkpatrick, who could be called America's own "Iron Lady."

Mrs. Kirkpatrick was President Reagan's ambassador to the United Nations when Miss Charles, who was prime minister of Dominica, acted on behalf of many Caribbean islands that feared the Marxist government of Grenada was part of a Cuban plan to impose communism throughout the region.

"She was an unlikely Mata Hari who convinced Ronald Reagan to liberate Grenada and save it from Castro," Mrs. Kirkpatrick said.

Ambassador Joseph Edmunds of St. Lucia, the deputy dean of the diplomatic corps, told Miss Charles, "We wish you a happy birthday, and I get satisfaction out of knowing that you will outlive many of us."

Miss Charles' father lived to 107, and her mother to 89.

Among those who attended her birthday party were King Kigeli, the exiled monarch of Rwanda; Ermias Sahle-Selassie, the exiled prince of Ethiopia; and Prince Obolensky, a descendant of Russian czars.

The party, organized by Washington public relations wizard Edward von Kloberg, also honored retiring Ambassador Albert Borg Olivier de Puget of Malta, former U.S. Ambassador Arthur Davis and Lionel-Alain Dupuis, a Canadian representative to the Organization of American States.

IRISH MATTERS

Two visiting Protestant politicians from Northern Ireland say they are satisfied that the Clinton administration is now taking a more realistic view of the troubles in their homeland.

The Protestant majority in Ulster wants the province to remain part of the United Kingdom and not be ceded to the Catholic-dominated Republic of Ireland. …

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