Theater;theater Mini-Reviews

By Pressley, Nelson | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 30, 1997 | Go to article overview

Theater;theater Mini-Reviews


Pressley, Nelson, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


OPENING

* Brimstone and Treacle - Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company. Dennis Potter's play, best known as an early 1980s film starring Sting, about a mysterious visitor. Opened yesterday. Through Nov. 23. 202/393-3939.

* Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk - National Theatre. Tap-dancing meets hip-hop and the blues in this tour through black history. Performances begin Wednesday and continue through Nov. 30. 800/447-7400.

* Camping With Henry and Tom - Washington Stage Guild. Mark St. Germian's comedy about a camping trip involving Henry Ford, Thomas Edison and Warren G. Harding. Opened yesterday. Through Nov. 30. 202/529-2084.

* Crystal - Theater of the First Amendment. Anna Theresa Cascio's play about a couple who adopt an 8-year-old girl. Performances begin Wednesday and continue through Nov. 23. 703/993-8888.

* The Darker Face of the Earth - Kennedy Center, Eisenhower Theater. Rita Dove's adaptation of the Oedipus legend, set in the antebellum South. Performances begin Wednesday and run through Nov. 30. 202/467-4600.

* New Anatomies - Theatre Conspiracy. The story of an independent woman's cultural adventures at the turn of the 20th century, by Timberlake Wertenbaker. At the District of Columbia Arts Center through Dec. 13. Opens tomorrow. 202/462-7833.

* Old Wicked Songs - Studio Theatre. Jon Marans' play about a young pianist, his aging professor and their common past. Performances begin Wednesday and continue through Dec. 7. 202/332-3300.

* Singin' in the Rain - Warner Theatre. The stage version of the classic Hollywood film. Performances begin Tuesday and continue through Nov. 9. 202/432-SEAT.

* Working - Signature Theatre. A revival of the musical inspired by Studs Terkel's book of Americans at work. Opened Tuesday. Through Dec. 7. 703/218-6500.

NOW PLAYING

* All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten - Ford's Theatre - (TWO STARS). No surprises here: This musical adaptation of Robert Fulghum's homiletic essays is cheerful, a bit sappy and an uneasy fit on the stage. The cast of five tells stories and sing songs about how to deal with life's ups and downs; it's harmless and generally uninteresting except when James Whitmore is doing the talking. The wily actor manages to find surprising depth in these earnest little fables. Through Sunday. 703/218-6500.

* Look! We Have Come Through! - Olney Theatre Center - (TWO STARS). A play fashioned from the letters and writings of D.H. Lawrence and his wife, suffering the usual problem of plays fashioned from nontheatrical writings. The subject is the unconventional Lawrences' relationship, and the show's conceit - having D.H. and Frieda virtually perform their letters and enact passages of Lawrence works such as "Women in Love" - tells us much about the couple's love and the writer's art. But it is often clumsy theater until the letter-reading (staged with near-frenzy) is put aside and the dramatic scenes from the books take the stage. Through Nov. 23. 301/924-3400.

* Moby Dick Rehearsed - American Century Theater - (THREE STARS). The subject of Orson Welles' 1955 adaptation of Herman Melville's whale of a tale is, in large part, Welles: his titanic imagination, obsession and frustration. Charles Matheny, as this impromptu rehearsal's director and as the driven captain Ahab, looks like a skinny Welles,{D-} and director Jack Marshall's production becomes a flamboyant, if extremely low-budget, object lesson in theater arts. …

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