Learning Styles, Classroom Environment Preferences, Teaching Styles, and Remedial Course Outcomes for Underprepared Adults at a Two-Year College

By Miglietti, Cynthia L.; Strange, C. Carney | Community College Review, Summer 1998 | Go to article overview

Learning Styles, Classroom Environment Preferences, Teaching Styles, and Remedial Course Outcomes for Underprepared Adults at a Two-Year College


Miglietti, Cynthia L., Strange, C. Carney, Community College Review


Sixty-one adult (age 25 and over) and 95 traditional-age (ages 18 through 24) two-year college students responded to a battery of instruments (Adult Classroom Environment Scale, Adaptive Style Inventory, Principles of Adult Learning Scale, and an Evaluation of Instruction Questionnaire) distributed in five remedial English and five remedial mathematics courses. Data analyses indicated that student age accounts for little variance in student expectations of the classroom environment, learning style, or select course outcomes. Nevertheless, students in reading and mathematics classes with learner-centered activities achieved higher course grades. Adult students in the mathematics sections reported a greater sense of accomplishment and a more positive total course experience than their traditional-age counterparts.

College campuses are becoming diverse academic communities with adult students enrolling in increasing numbers. A 1990 nationwide campus survey of all types of institutions indicated that 6 million students over age 25 are studying for college credit each year (National Center for Education Statistics, 1992). Also established was the fact that 45% of all undergraduate and graduate students were over age 25, with the prediction that over the next seven years that proportion could increase. Nevertheless, higher education in general has not been very responsive to older learners. The exception to this has been the two-year institution, which includes junior, community, and technical colleges. The multifaceted role of the junior college, which includes providing terminal and transfer programs along with multipurpose services in the community, transformed many such institutions into community colleges, reflecting their wider role in the community (Boss, 1985; Mickler & Zippert, 1987). Because of their emphasis on serving the community, as well as their capacity for responding quickly to market needs, two-year colleges have been more successful than four-year institutions in attracting nontraditional learners. Adult students bring to the classroom unique learning interests, educational goals, and instructional needs. Are educators responding appropriately?

As college enrollments grow more diverse, meeting the instructional needs of a changing student population is paramount. Serving students well should include examining students' preferences for different teaching styles as well as their expectations of the classroom environment. The process should also include an examination of learning styles and how each of these factors--teaching style, classroom environment, and learning style --contributes to students' academic achievement and satisfaction. With the need for continuous learning to adapt in today's society, nonparticipation among adult learners will have serious consequences for everyone--the individual, the institution, and society.

Within this context, two basic queries formed the focus of the present study: (a) What, if any, is the relationship between students' ages and their ideal classroom expectations and preferred learning styles? (b) Are varying levels of academic achievement, sense of accomplishment, and overall course satisfaction a function of the interactions of differing teaching styles, classroom environments, and learning styles? Considerable attention in the research on adult learners has emphasized the importance of the learner's active role (Brookfield, 1988). Consequently, the facilitator's role has been given only secondary consideration (Brockett & Darkenwald, 1987). Researchers have expanded their interests to include the facilitator's influence on student satisfaction, achievement, persistence, and retention (Beder & Carrea, 1988; Charkins, O'Toole & Wetzel, 1985; Conti, 1985a, 1985b; Conti & Welborn, 1986; Graham, 1988), and the effect of the classroom environment on decision-making and communication patterns, outcomes, persistence, course content, and satisfaction (Beder & Carrea, 1988; Beer & Darkenwald, 1989; Darkenwald & Gavin, 1987; Ennis et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Learning Styles, Classroom Environment Preferences, Teaching Styles, and Remedial Course Outcomes for Underprepared Adults at a Two-Year College
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.