Round and About: January

History Today, January 2000 | Go to article overview

Round and About: January


London

1900: Art at the Crossroads

January 16th - April 3rd 1999

Royal Academy of Arts
Piccadilly, London W1V 0DS
Tel: 020 8300 8000

Inspired by the World's Fair of 1900 in Paris, this exhibition draws on the masters who were featured in the Exposition Universelle, including Degas, Cezanne, Renoir, Monet, Rodin, Klimt, as well as emerging artists of the time like Picasso, Kandinsky and Matisse. Organised into sections including rural and urban scenes, religion and portraits, the works explore themes such as nationalism, nostalgia, the impact of technology, psychology and fairy tales.

The Korean War 1950-1953

January 18th - March 7th

National Maritime Museum
Greenwich, London SE10 9NF
Tel: 020 8312 6747

A study course examining the naval aspects of the war, including Britain's role, mine warfare, the part played by the media, blockade and bombardment and the Soviet part in the war.

The 20th-Century Navy

January 19th - March 8th

National Maritime Museum

This course examines how Britain's use of naval power has changed in response to differing political and economic needs during the last hundred years and attempts a reassessment of Britain's 20th century naval power and policy.

Princes of Victorian Bohemia: Photographs by David Wilkie Wynfield

28th January - 14th May

National Portrait Gallery
London WC2H OHE
Tel: 020 7306 0055

In the 1860s the painter David Wilkie Wynfield produced a series of original photographic portraits. He used a narrow depth-of-field, dramatic close-ups and historical costume to model his sitters in the image of the courtiers and noblemen painted by the Old Masters. Wynfield was one of the first photographers to use `soft-focus' to create artistic photography and his works inspired Julia Margaret Cameron.

The Art of Invention

Until April 24th 2000

Science Museum
South Kensington
London SW7 2DD
Tel: 020 7942 4455/4454

This exhibition attempts to bring to prominence the `renaissance of machines' which has been shadowed by the concentration of the Renaissance period on arts and literature. Its three sections are devoted to Filippo Brunilleschi, the Sienese engineers and Leonardo da Vinci, and it includes an array of large, vivid silk-screen prints, forming a gallery of `machine portraits' by the major artist-engineers of the fifteenth-century. …

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