Uneasy Alliance for Bush, Minority African-Americans Evaluate Governor

By Pendleton, Randolph | The Florida Times Union, January 16, 2000 | Go to article overview

Uneasy Alliance for Bush, Minority African-Americans Evaluate Governor


Pendleton, Randolph, The Florida Times Union


TALLAHASSEE -- Gov. Jeb Bush sat down with Rep. Willie Logan and three other Black Caucus members on the second day of this month's special session and gave them the bad news: He would not support their amendment to the death penalty appeals bill.

Later that day, Logan, a Democrat from Opa-locka, gave Bush the bad news: He would not vote for the bill.

Only one of the 15 Black Caucus members, Rep. Rudy Bradley, R-St. Petersburg, voted for the legislation when it passed 80-35 the next day.

Although African-Americans typically vote for Democrats, Bush courted them in his 1998 campaign for governor and won the support of some, such as Logan and Bradley.

But he and the African-American legislators have proved to be uncertain allies.

Bush has appointed African-Americans to important positions, promised to increase diversity in university enroll- ments and state contracts without using racial preferences through his One Florida initiative, and rejected lists of judicial candidates that did not include enough African-Americans and women.

On the other hand, he opposed the amendment letting appeals courts consider the influence of racism in reviewing death sentences, and his decision to replace affirmative action with his own plan for increasing diversity alarmed many in the African-American community.

African-Americans have had mixed reactions to the new Republican governor.

Bradley, who switched parties to become the Legislature's only African-American Republican, says a better question than what has Bush done for African-Americans would be what did other governors do in the past 100 years.

With more African-Americans in prison than in college, AIDS running rampant and infrastructure crumbling in the core cities, Bradley said, Bush inherited a mess and is doing what he can to fix the situation.

"He has done a tremendous job," Bradley said.

Logan, who broke with his fellow Democrats when they dumped him as their leader two years ago, has followed an independent course -- sometimes supporting Bush, sometimes not.

"We're still friends," Logan said after opposing the governor on the bill to speed up death penalty appeals.

Others are not so cordial, at least publicly.

PERSONALITY CLASH

Committed African-American Democrats like Sen. Betty Holzendorf of Jacksonville have scorned Bush's efforts to seek African-American support.

"He's done it like a master on a plantation," Holzendorf said. "He's got his house Negroes and his field Negroes. His policy seems to be divide and conquer."

The Rev. Rudolph McKissick Jr., pastor of Bethel Baptist Institutional Church, thinks Bush is trying to do the right thing but could go about it more effectively.

McKissick, who was with a group of African-American ministers who met with Bush in Tallahassee a week ago to discuss his affirmative action proposal, said he told the governor it would be wise to seek the views of those who are skeptical as well as those who support him.

"You have to bring in those who the community holds as the guardians of the gate," McKissick said. "That may be the missing piece in the community-at-large believing he is sincere."

McKissick added that the consultation with such groups must be before the policy is formed, not after.

Logan said that Bush needs a close adviser who has a finger on the pulse of the African-American community and can anticipate problems, like those that arose when he announced his proposal to curtail affirmative action.

Logan said Bush has talented African-Americans in high positions, but no one in his inner circle with close ties to the grass roots.

"He is lacking an insider staff person who can be his ears and eyes within the black community," Logan said.

Logan admitted it might be difficult to find such a person, many fear they would be accused of selling out by other African-Americans. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Uneasy Alliance for Bush, Minority African-Americans Evaluate Governor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.