A Huff, a Puff and Prescott Backs Down

By Richards, Steve | New Statesman (1996), December 13, 1999 | Go to article overview

A Huff, a Puff and Prescott Backs Down


Richards, Steve, New Statesman (1996)


Watching John Prescott being torn apart by the media brings to mind one of Tony Benn's homilies from the early 1980s. "Politics is about issues, not personalities," Benn observed as he mesmerised with his own unique political personality.

Still, as with many of Benn's comments, the chutzpah concealed more than a grain of truth. Labour's own experience out of power is proof of that. Benn's "personality" did not bring about the divisions over policies in the early 1980s, any more than Kenneth Clarke or Michael Portillo were responsible for the collapse of the last Conservative government. The Tories were split over the issue of Europe, and there was nothing much any personality could do about it.

On the whole, the personalities of the last government rather liked each other. Most of them, it seemed, had been friends since university and would still occasionally have a drink, in spite of the fierce ideological divide. In the current government, there are virtually no policy divisions, but its leading members despise each other. Much of the policy is sorted out in Downing Street and the Treasury, with David Blunkett and Jack Straw getting a look in every now and again. The others just seem pleased to be there after being out of power for so long. That they do not like each other does not seem to matter: the government is still way ahead in the polls. Clashes over policy harm governments; personality clashes make headlines, but do not have such serious consequences.

Taking Benn as an erratic, but perceptive guide, I don't believe Prescott's personality has anything to do with the transport crisis. If anything, Prescott's personal contribution has been as much positive as negative. But the positive and negative have cancelled each other out and left us pretty much where we were before, which was stranded at a run-down railway station or waiting at a bus stop.

To take the positive side of Prescott first. More than any other shadow cabinet member apart from Gordon Brown, he gave much thought to policy in opposition. Indeed in a wide-ranging interview to be published in next week's New Statesman millennium edition, Neil Kinnock, who had a turbulent relationship with Prescott (to put it politely), generously praises the Deputy PM for his attention to detail during that period.

Prescott arrived in his job knowing much more about the scale of the crisis and the potential remedies than other ministers entering the Whitehall minefield for the first time.

But Prescott is not as assertive as he seems. This is his negative side, and it cancels out his ministerial expertise. Prescott huffs and puffs, but does not blow the house down.

Being huffed and puffed at by Prescott can be an intimidating experience. I write as someone who has been at the end of his huffing and puffing. I needed to lie down immediately afterwards. …

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