In the Beginning, There Was Film Appreciation

By Adams, Kevin | Metro Magazine, May 2019 | Go to article overview

In the Beginning, There Was Film Appreciation


Adams, Kevin, Metro Magazine


Our beloved teaching association didn't really take off until the Association of Teachers of Film Appreciation (ATFA), founded in 1963, became the Association of Teachers of Film and Video (ATFAV) in 1974 and Metro in its current form was born. ATOM--first as Association for the Teachers of Media from 1978, then Australian Teachers of Media from 1981 came about not long after. During my time (including my turn as committee president from 1972 to 1975, after which I was awarded a life membership), I saw it change from a largely film-appreciation-oriented group to a platform that included a wide range of media formats and a diverse range of teachers.

In 1974, we had an extraordinary general meeting at the Trak Cinema in Toorak to discuss the rapidly changing face of the association, the widening of the needs of our new membership base, our film advisory service, and our inclusion of photography and video--that is, we were morphing into a wider vehicle for teachers of media. Following then-treasurer Wayne Levy's huge task of renumbering the issues of ATFA/ATFAV's publications, the first magazine to carry the new Metro logo was released, circa March 1974. Then-editor Dawn Brown had been busy getting a government grant, had lobbied many committees, including the Karmel Commission, and was seeking support for premises in Carlton.

By then, I was well and truly on the ATFAV committee. But how did I get into media? It was a combination of survival and a need to engage a small group of difficult students. It was 1966 and I was thirty. I had been a primary teacher for eight years. To enable me to start a degree at Monash Uni, 'The Dept' seconded me part-time to a high school. On day one of Term 1, I was 'parachuted' into Dandenong High (which didn't have me on its staffing list, so I had no teaching allocation). The senior master then introduced me to a group of fifteen boys who'd been banished to the oval until they cut off their Beatle haircuts (some things never change), and suddenly I was their form teacher. They became 4R.

In between driving up and down the highway to Monash and trying to come to grips with subjects and content I'd never taught, I tried to figure out how I'd survive a year with 4R. While they were strong-willed and recalcitrant, there was also something endearing about them.

During my first lesson with them, they said poetry was for girls, Shakespeare was old-fashioned, the novel was boring, and so on. The next day, I arrived armed with handouts of lyrics by The Beatles, Bob Dylan and Simon & Garfunkel. It was a no-brainer: if you can't beat them, join them. I announced that these songwriters were modern poets. This didn't go down so well, so I read out the lyrics and drew attention to their obvious poetic qualities; 4R reluctantly agreed. (Fifty years on, I was a bit amused when Bob Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

In the Beginning, There Was Film Appreciation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.