Internet Scout Project

By Diaz, Karen R.; Wells, Amy Tracy | Reference & User Services Quarterly, Summer 1999 | Go to article overview

Internet Scout Project


Diaz, Karen R., Wells, Amy Tracy, Reference & User Services Quarterly


Promoting Resource Discovery for Research and Education

Two summers ago, I visited Pergamum and Ephesus in modern day Turkey. As the second and third largest libraries in antiquity, built in the second century B.C. and A.D. 135, respectively, they were surpassed only by the library at Alexandria, in modern day Egypt, which was composed in part from Pergamum's looted collection.(1) Methods of organizing printed materials, from parchment to a newer technology known as paper, have been developed and refined over the course of two-plus millennium and counting. In contrast, search services such as Yahoo! and Alta Vista have been extant since 1994 and 1995, respectively.(2) While these search engines and others like them have strengths, their weaknesses are well known: a high percentage of nonauthoritative content mixed with quality content that, when indexed together, makes locating relevant information serendipitous at best. It is too late to go back and develop an Internet solely composed of material "looted" from our best libraries, but many of the traditional methods of collecting and organizing the information available can still be effectively applied in an electronic environment.

The Internet Scout Project (http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/), a National Science Foundation (NSF) (www.nsf.gov/) project housed in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is charged with promoting resource discovery to aid the U.S. higher research and education community, specifically the scientific and engineering community. To that end, the project is focused in three principle areas: (1) identification of quality Internet resources; (2) subsequent resource description; and (3) the development of a distributed resource network. All of its products and services are free and freely accessible. Its audience has grown to include the private sector and the general public as well as individuals outside of the United States.

Internet Resource Directory

Net-happenings, the Scout Report, and Subject-Specific Scout Reports

Since 1993 and 1994 respectively, Net-happenings (http://scout.cs.wisc. edu/caservices/net-hap/index.html) and the Scout Report (http://scout. cs.wisc.edu/index.html) have been identifying electronic resources. Net-happenings is a K-12-oriented daily announcement distribution service for Internet resources, software, conferences, newsletters, etc. It is distributed via e-mail, the Web, and a Usenet newsgroup (comp.internet.nethappenings) and reaches more than twenty-five thousand people daily. The Scout Report identifies research and educational resources as well as network tools and then describes each resource in critical detail. The Scout Report is available via e-mail and the Web.

In 1997, in response to direct requests from users, the Internet Scout Project began to publish three subject-specific Scout Reports: the Scout Report for Science and Engineering, the Scout Report for Business and Economics, and the Scout Report for Social Sciences. Each of these reports targets resources in a given discipline, covering new publications such as books, journals, and reports; conferences; calls for papers; grant announcements; and updated data sets along with other useful sites for researchers. Designed to provide the most current disciplinary information, they are distributed on a biweekly basis. These Scout Reports are also available via e-mail and the Web. In all, the Scout Reports reach more than one hundred thousand people weekly.

Scout Report and the Subject-Specific Scout Reports Methodology

The Scout Report and subject-specific Scout Reports have a managing editor and production editor as well as a team of master's and doctoral students who select, annotate, and compose/compile those reports related to their area of study. Other Internet Scout Project staff also assist by writing seventy-five to one hundred word annotations for one or two resources per week. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Internet Scout Project
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.