Going Ape: Paleontology, Physical Anthropology and Evolution

By Holzberg, Carol S. | Technology & Learning, January 2000 | Go to article overview

Going Ape: Paleontology, Physical Anthropology and Evolution


Holzberg, Carol S., Technology & Learning


Almost 150 years after the publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species, the theory of evolution remains embroiled in controversy. Even if you don't believe humans and apes evolved from a common ancestor, there is scientific evidence that life on Earth is over three billion years old. Learn more about Earth's ancient past and the people who lived thousands of years ago by visiting these Web sites.

* Neandertal News (www.archaeology.org/9609/ newsbriefs/neandertals.html) Identification of a 34,000-year-old Neandertal temporal bone from an archeological site in France suggests that Neandertals and early modern humans did not interbreed. Considered to be relatives of early humans rather than humans themselves, Neandertals were known to use stone tools and fire for illumination, but the physical and anatomical distance separating them from humans is too great to provide evidence of interbreeding. Visit this Web site to find out more about the bone discovery, complete with maps. Additional information can be found at the virtual Neanderthal Museum in Germany (www.neanderthal.dete_thal/fs_l.htm).

* Flints and Stones: Real Life in Prehistory (www. ncl.ac.ukl~nantiq/menu.html) Learn more about the culture and lifestyle of late Stone Age hunter-gatherers in Britain and northwest Europe through pictures and stories. Discover how the Earth's changing climate 12.5 thousand years ago (at the end of the Ice Age) affected the Paleolithic world. Find out what hunter gatherers ate and where they lived. Learn more at the section on clearing up misconceptions and shattering stereotypes. Great cartoons!

* Guide to Internet Resources for Studying Human Evolution (users.ox.ac.uk/~newc0607/ evlink/evlink.html#links) Dr. Mark Leney, an anthropologist at Oxford University in England, has put together an amazing collection of Web resources, animated graphics and news forums about evolution. Many of them complement the tutorials he teaches at Oxford and Cambridge universities. You'll find links to human and hominid behavior, Paleolithic findings, Homo habilis, great pictures of stone tools, materials on the origin of modern humans, essays on primate intelligence, and much more. …

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