Guest Editorial

By Frank, Blye; Davison, Kevin G. | The Journal of Men's Studies, Winter 2000 | Go to article overview

Guest Editorial


Frank, Blye, Davison, Kevin G., The Journal of Men's Studies


Over recent decades, many scholars and practitioners have positioned gender as central in their work. More often than not in education the focus has been on the inequities of girls and young women. Until recently, there has been an absence of research that has explored the lived practice of masculinities in the lives of boys and men in schooling. This special issue of The Journal of Men's Studies on Boys, Men, Masculinity, and Education gathers together research that combines the growing field of masculinities with that of education. Featuring the work of scholars from North America, Europe, and Australia, the scope of the research presented here is far wider than we had originally anticipated.

The volume begins with Jane Kenway, Lindsay Fitzclarence, and Lindsay Hasluck's article, "Toxic Shock," which draws attention to the everyday violence experienced by young male apprentices. "Boys on the Road" by Linley Walker, Dianne Butland, and Robert Connell illuminates how young men's obsessions with car culture is learned in a particular way that encourages unsafe driving.

The next three articles are concerned with issues of homophobia, heterosexism, and sexual identities in schooling. "Masculinity, School, and Self in Sweden and the Netherlands" by Alan Segal offers a look at sexual identities of European youth and illustrates the multiple understandings of the self. Martin Mac an Ghaill's "Rethinking (Male) Gendered Sexualities: What about the British Heteros?" begins to problematize dominant heterosexuality. And finally, Wayne Martino continues the interrogation of heteronormativity in "Policing Masculinities," illustrating the extent of homophobic harassment in the lives of boys on a daily basis.

The last two articles in this issue draw attention to physicality and body image of youth. Carmel Desmarchelier uses Pierre Bordieu's concept of habitus to explore how homosexuality and body image are understood by educators. Kevin Davison's "Boys' Bodies in School" closes the volume by addressing the possibilities, complexities, and contradictions of masculinities in institutionalized schooling. …

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