Assessing the Comparability of Classroom Environments in Graduate Social Work Education Delivered Via Interactive Instructional Television

By Freddolino, Paul P.; Sutherland, Cheryl A. | Journal of Social Work Education, Winter 2000 | Go to article overview

Assessing the Comparability of Classroom Environments in Graduate Social Work Education Delivered Via Interactive Instructional Television


Freddolino, Paul P., Sutherland, Cheryl A., Journal of Social Work Education


THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY in a rapidly changing society is becoming redefined. The Information Age has put a premium on access to the types of resources the university has traditionally supplied: education, research, and continuing professional development. This produces intense competition from two new sources: media organizations that develop similar services but with more sophisticated and modern appearances, and new "virtual universities" that offer courses and even complete degrees with few, if any, of the traditional components like classrooms and laboratories (Hammon & Albiston, 1998).

At the same time, the demographics of students seeking educational offerings are also changing. Some are mature adults seeking a second or third career. Others seek additional education in their chosen field. Professionals who once thought their school-based education was completed are returning to seek more advanced degrees or certificates. Many of these returning students do not fit the "traditional" profile on which university programs were originally built. They come with well-invested careers and the social and community responsibilities associated with families and homes. They are not in any position to leave it all behind for one, two, or more years to concentrate exclusively on the requirements of academic programs. Furthermore, because of their extensive responsibilities, the "new" class of students are generally unable to invest the time needed to commute very far in the pursuit of quality education. To meet these students' needs, universities are increasingly being asked to expand their outreach programs, a need that fits the mission of land-grant institutions, such as the authors', which have always maintained a philosophy of open access and a commitment to community service.

The increased need for outreach programs during times of fiscal restraint has forced universities to be innovative while continuing to do more with less. Innovation requires a pioneering attitude and a realization that there may indeed not be a known solution to a given problem. Innovation in outreach means continual assessment, a penchant to utilize technology, and a willingness to try new approaches (Predko & Galindo, 1993). One indicator of the scope of such new efforts in American higher education is the number and diversity of complete degree programs incorporating one or multiple new technologies in their delivery (National University Continuing Education Association, 1993).

Graduate social work programs are no exception. A 1996 survey documented growing use of various electronic media for distance education in undergraduate and graduate social work degree programs throughout the United States (Siegel, Jennings, Conklin, & Napoletano Flynn, 1998). The need for and acceptance of distance education programs in graduate social work are also common themes at professional conferences (Black, 1997; Blakely, 1992, 1994; Cochrane, Sullivan, & Bloom, 1995; Conklin, 1994; Day, 1995; Freddolino, 1996; Haga & Heitkamp, 1995;Jackson & Nair, 1995; Jennings, Siegel, & Conklin, 1995; Kalke, Rooney, & Macy, 1998; Raymond, 1988; Sheafor, 1994).

Other findings have also been reported in the social work literature. Thyer, Polk, and Gaudin (1997) report that students prefer face-to-face instruction when compared directly to interactive video instruction (see also Thyer, Artelt, Markward, & Dozier, 1998). Rooney and Bibus (1995) conducted an evaluation of a continuing education course using one-way television and two-way audio by telephone; students' reports indicated that televised instruction was effective in promoting student learning. Petracchi and Morgenbesser (1995) found that undergraduate social work students taught by televised videotapes had better outcomes than students receiving live instruction. However, although numerous studies in other fields have demonstrated comparable process and outcomes from electronically mediated distance education (Chute, Balthazar, & Poston, 1988; Cunningham, 1988; Miller, 1988; Mount & Walters, 1985), the published literature in social work has not addressed whether--and under what conditions--courses offered via electronic media provide a learning environment comparable to that in the on-campus site. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Assessing the Comparability of Classroom Environments in Graduate Social Work Education Delivered Via Interactive Instructional Television
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.