How Donald Trump Decided to Go Soft on White Supremacists; in the Aftermath of Charlottesville, Trump's Statement about the Clash Became a Large Part of the News Itself and Was Widely Criticized for Inflaming the Situation by Not Unequivocally Condemning the Actions of the White Supremacists

By McAuliffe, Terry | Newsweek, August 9, 2019 | Go to article overview

How Donald Trump Decided to Go Soft on White Supremacists; in the Aftermath of Charlottesville, Trump's Statement about the Clash Became a Large Part of the News Itself and Was Widely Criticized for Inflaming the Situation by Not Unequivocally Condemning the Actions of the White Supremacists


McAuliffe, Terry, Newsweek


Byline: Terry McAuliffe

In the aftermath of the Charlottesville riot and the tragic deaths of Heather Heyer and two state troopers (who died in a helicopter accident during the chaos of the day), President Donald Trump's statement about the clash became a large part of the news itself.

He has been widely criticized for inflaming the situation by not unequivocally condemning the actions of the white supremacists at the rally and mentioning fine people "on many sides" of the issue; in a later press conference he did walk that back by saying, "I'm not talking about the neo-Nazis and the white nationalists, because they should be condemned totally," but it was seen as too little, too late.

In this excerpt from Beyond Charlottesville, former Governor Terry McAuliffe describes his reaction to Trump's news conference.

Donald Trump said he would be going in front of the cameras right after our call to address the tragedy of what happened in Charlottesville.

I would hold off on making any statement until after the president had spoken. He was going to come out against these white supremacists brandishing Confederate flags and neo-Nazis with swastikas on their shields. This should not have been a hard choice to make. Trump was going to take a clear stand. I thanked the president for his support in our time of crisis and said, "Mr. President, let's you and I work together to heal these wounds."

Then something happened. I don't know what, but something.

I kept waiting, and still there was no Trump press conference. An hour later, still no Trump. I had given him updated information from all the relevant law enforcement on the ground in Charlottesville. The nation was waiting. Who else did he need to consult? I can't say. I can't account for the missing hours. I just know that when Trump finally stepped up to the podium, he let America down.

"We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence," he began, but then added, looking up from his notes, "on many sides, on many sides."

What was he talking about? On many sides? The president and I had only talked about one side, the side with the heavily armed white supremacists and neo-Nazis on a mission of hate and violence, not the other side with peaceful protesters taking a stand against hate and division. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

How Donald Trump Decided to Go Soft on White Supremacists; in the Aftermath of Charlottesville, Trump's Statement about the Clash Became a Large Part of the News Itself and Was Widely Criticized for Inflaming the Situation by Not Unequivocally Condemning the Actions of the White Supremacists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.