University Business Schools Cash in on Popular E-Commerce Programs

By Stefanova, Kristina | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 21, 2000 | Go to article overview

University Business Schools Cash in on Popular E-Commerce Programs


Stefanova, Kristina, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Colleges and universities are finding there's money to be made in electronic commerce, not as a sales tool but as a course of study.

Business curriculums geared toward graduate students are spawning at local higher education institutions in response to a growing demand by both students and high-technology companies. But few schools nationwide offer them at the undergraduate level.

Old Dominion University in Norfolk will be among the first in the nation to offer degree programs in electronic commerce, better known as e-commerce, at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

"It's one of the hottest areas in terms of business academics on the horizon," said J. Taylor Sims, dean of the College of Business and Public Administration at ODU.

The 70-year-old university is starting an e-commerce concentration in both its undergraduate and graduate programs this fall, and hopes to start a bachelor's and master's degree program in science and e-commerce in the fall of 2001.

Students majoring in e-commerce take all field-related courses. Students concentrating in it take several e-commerce courses but major in a different field of business.

Before the degree programs can begin, ODU's proposal to Virginia's State Council of Higher Education has to be approved.

"I'm receiving 10 calls a day from potential undergraduate students, and about 25 calls a week from students interested in the master's level," Mr. Sims said. "And admissions is getting even more inquiries."

ODU turns out nearly 2,000 business graduates a year. Of those, 10 percent will be e-commerce majors in two years, Mr. Sims said.

The e-commerce field has grown tremendously and will continue to grow even faster, experts say. So far in its short history, the e-business field has generated $71.4 million in revenues. By 2002 that number will jump to $400 billion, and by 2003 it will hit $650 billion, according to EMarketer.com, an on-line group that collects Internet data.

Roy Moore, executive director of the 450-member Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs based in Overland Park, Kan., said he is seeing increased interest in such programs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

University Business Schools Cash in on Popular E-Commerce Programs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.